Why are we against Basic Income? How can the way we view work enable or limit the resistance against basic income?

Joachim Kjær Heidelbach, Stefan Stokic & Nikola Soskic

Student thesis: Basic Project

Abstract

This study has been conducted with the purpose of acquiring insights into the argumentation against the idea of basic income. This project has a specific interest into deriving the underlying factors and structures behind the argumentation against the idea of basic income. Herein a specific focus on the way work is viewed in Danish society, as an underlying structure in the debate of basic income.

The study started off with a sorting of the most substantial argumentation against basic income, this was done through a specific sorting strategy, a strategy that made it possible to sort through all the arguments to be sorted into the most substantial arguments in the arguments against basic income in Denmark. The sorting strategy has resulted in the most substantial arguments being evaluated to be “the moral duty to be employed” and “the sleeping pillow argument”. The sleeping pillow argument are based on the argumentation aimed towards the idea that the citizens will stay at home, and simply receive basic income and feel no need to do anything else, and therefore “sleep” on your basic income and have it be your primary income and just stay at home with no motivation to active-ly engage in labour.
The analysis into the deeper underlying factors and structures, behind the argumentation against basic income, based in the way work is viewed, have among others been found to be seen in the theory of the capitalistic spirit, and the competitive states structure of creating incentive to work. As these theories have been found to be seen in the way the argumentation against basic income are formulated.
An alternating way to view work have as well been analysed in order of deriving knowledge into how a change of the way work is viewed, potentially could change the argumentation against basic income. Studies of Michael Husen, Zygmunt Bauman and Cato Wadel among others have been included in the analysis of alternating views of the way work is viewed and are debated against the way the argumentation against basic income are formulated. The study has concluded that some alternating views of the way work is viewed could potentially change how basic income is argued against.

EducationsBasic - Bachelor Study Program in Social Science, (Bachelor Programme) Basic
LanguageDanish
Publication date19 Dec 2017
Number of pages52
SupervisorsPeter Mølgaard Nielsen