User participation in implementation

Benedicte Fleron, Rasmus Rasmussen, Jesper Simonsen, Morten Hertzum

    Research output: Contribution to journalConference articleResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    Systems development has been claimed to benefit from user participation, yet user participation in implementation activities may be more common and is a growing focus of participatory-design work. We investigate the effect of the extensive user participation in the implementation of a clinical system by empirically analyzing how management, participating staff, and non-participating staff view the implementation process with respect to areas that have previously been linked to user participation such as system quality, emergent interactions, and psychological buy-in. The participating staff experienced more uncertainty and frustration than management and non-participating staff, especially concerning how to run an implementation process and how to understand and utilize the configuration possibilities of the system. This suggests that user participation in implementation introduces a need for new competences. Our results also emphasize the importance of access to fellow colleagues with relevant experience in implementing systems.
    Original languageEnglish
    Book seriesP D C
    Volume2
    Pages (from-to)61-64
    Number of pages4
    ISSN2150-5896
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2012
    Event12th Participatory Design Conference: PDC2012 - Roskilde University, Roskilde, Denmark
    Duration: 12 Aug 201216 Aug 2012
    http://pdc2012.org/

    Conference

    Conference12th Participatory Design Conference
    LocationRoskilde University
    CountryDenmark
    CityRoskilde
    Period12/08/201216/08/2012
    Internet address

    Cite this

    Fleron, Benedicte ; Rasmussen, Rasmus ; Simonsen, Jesper ; Hertzum, Morten. / User participation in implementation. In: P D C. 2012 ; Vol. 2. pp. 61-64.
    @inproceedings{07ef5263a8f240ad95e4fbd156c7ae3d,
    title = "User participation in implementation",
    abstract = "Systems development has been claimed to benefit from user participation, yet user participation in implementation activities may be more common and is a growing focus of participatory-design work. We investigate the effect of the extensive user participation in the implementation of a clinical system by empirically analyzing how management, participating staff, and non-participating staff view the implementation process with respect to areas that have previously been linked to user participation such as system quality, emergent interactions, and psychological buy-in. The participating staff experienced more uncertainty and frustration than management and non-participating staff, especially concerning how to run an implementation process and how to understand and utilize the configuration possibilities of the system. This suggests that user participation in implementation introduces a need for new competences. Our results also emphasize the importance of access to fellow colleagues with relevant experience in implementing systems.",
    author = "Benedicte Fleron and Rasmus Rasmussen and Jesper Simonsen and Morten Hertzum",
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    doi = "10.1145/2348144.2348164",
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    User participation in implementation. / Fleron, Benedicte; Rasmussen, Rasmus; Simonsen, Jesper; Hertzum, Morten.

    In: P D C, Vol. 2, 2012, p. 61-64.

    Research output: Contribution to journalConference articleResearchpeer-review

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    T1 - User participation in implementation

    AU - Fleron, Benedicte

    AU - Rasmussen, Rasmus

    AU - Simonsen, Jesper

    AU - Hertzum, Morten

    PY - 2012

    Y1 - 2012

    N2 - Systems development has been claimed to benefit from user participation, yet user participation in implementation activities may be more common and is a growing focus of participatory-design work. We investigate the effect of the extensive user participation in the implementation of a clinical system by empirically analyzing how management, participating staff, and non-participating staff view the implementation process with respect to areas that have previously been linked to user participation such as system quality, emergent interactions, and psychological buy-in. The participating staff experienced more uncertainty and frustration than management and non-participating staff, especially concerning how to run an implementation process and how to understand and utilize the configuration possibilities of the system. This suggests that user participation in implementation introduces a need for new competences. Our results also emphasize the importance of access to fellow colleagues with relevant experience in implementing systems.

    AB - Systems development has been claimed to benefit from user participation, yet user participation in implementation activities may be more common and is a growing focus of participatory-design work. We investigate the effect of the extensive user participation in the implementation of a clinical system by empirically analyzing how management, participating staff, and non-participating staff view the implementation process with respect to areas that have previously been linked to user participation such as system quality, emergent interactions, and psychological buy-in. The participating staff experienced more uncertainty and frustration than management and non-participating staff, especially concerning how to run an implementation process and how to understand and utilize the configuration possibilities of the system. This suggests that user participation in implementation introduces a need for new competences. Our results also emphasize the importance of access to fellow colleagues with relevant experience in implementing systems.

    U2 - 10.1145/2348144.2348164

    DO - 10.1145/2348144.2348164

    M3 - Conference article

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    SP - 61

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    JO - P D C

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