The Relevance of the No-self Theory for Contemporary Mindfulness

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

The ideas of mindfulness and no-self are intimately connected in
Buddhist philosophy. This is because, in Buddhist Philosophy,
the practice of mindfulness leads to the realization that there is no
self. In contemporary mindfulness in psychology, the no-self
theory has not played such a basic role. An outline of Buddhist
philosophy is given showing how the ‘root delusion’ of having a
self lies at the base of human suffering and how mindfulness,
when appropriately deployed, enables one to free oneself from
this delusion and thus achieve psychological well-being. This is
not to say that mindfulness based interventions do not help to
alleviate suffering. Nor is it to say that people working in these
areas should not use mindfulness in their own way. It is only to say
that by ignoring the no-self experience, teachers and practioners
are falling short of achieving what mindfulness was originally
employed to achieve.
Original languageEnglish
JournalCurrent Opinion in Psychology
Volume28
Issue number2
Pages (from-to)298-301
Number of pages4
ISSN2352-250X
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2 Apr 2019

Cite this

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title = "The Relevance of the No-self Theory for Contemporary Mindfulness",
abstract = "The ideas of mindfulness and no-self are intimately connected inBuddhist philosophy. This is because, in Buddhist Philosophy,the practice of mindfulness leads to the realization that there is noself. In contemporary mindfulness in psychology, the no-selftheory has not played such a basic role. An outline of Buddhistphilosophy is given showing how the ‘root delusion’ of having aself lies at the base of human suffering and how mindfulness,when appropriately deployed, enables one to free oneself fromthis delusion and thus achieve psychological well-being. This isnot to say that mindfulness based interventions do not help toalleviate suffering. Nor is it to say that people working in theseareas should not use mindfulness in their own way. It is only to saythat by ignoring the no-self experience, teachers and practionersare falling short of achieving what mindfulness was originallyemployed to achieve.",
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The Relevance of the No-self Theory for Contemporary Mindfulness. / Giles, James.

In: Current Opinion in Psychology, Vol. 28, No. 2, 02.04.2019, p. 298-301.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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