Judicialising Peace: The International Criminal Court's Impact on Political Settlements in Kenya and Uganda

Research output: Book/ReportPh.D. thesisResearch

Abstract

Analysing two peace processes in Kenya and Uganda, this dissertation argues that what matters to peace processes that experience an ICC intervention is the timing and level of ICC involvement as well as the interpretation of particular aspects of the Rome Statute by key ICC officials.
This argument centres on the notion of international legalisation. It derives from four analyses: A deconstruction of the idea of international Justice that animates the ICC and its constituency; interpretive process analyses of the Juba Peace Talks between the Ugandan government and the Lord's Resistance Army as well as the Kenya National Dialogue and Reconciliation following the 2008 post-election violence; and, lastly, an inductive comparison of these two peace processes.
Translated title of the contributionRetsliggørelse af fred: Den internationale straffedomstols påvirkning af politiske løsninger i Kenya og Uganda
Original languageEnglish
Place of PublicationAarhus
PublisherForlaget Politica
Number of pages512
ISBN (Print)978-87-7335-181-9
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2014
Externally publishedYes
SeriesPoliticas ph.d.-serie

Keywords

  • The International Criminal Court
  • Judicialisation of politics
  • Peace Processes
  • Kenya
  • Uganda
  • Lord's Resistance Army
  • Conflict Resolution

Cite this

@phdthesis{ed7203179de34f7db3f04100322bfe8c,
title = "Judicialising Peace: The International Criminal Court's Impact on Political Settlements in Kenya and Uganda",
abstract = "Analysing two peace processes in Kenya and Uganda, this dissertation argues that what matters to peace processes that experience an ICC intervention is the timing and level of ICC involvement as well as the interpretation of particular aspects of the Rome Statute by key ICC officials.This argument centres on the notion of international legalisation. It derives from four analyses: A deconstruction of the idea of international Justice that animates the ICC and its constituency; interpretive process analyses of the Juba Peace Talks between the Ugandan government and the Lord's Resistance Army as well as the Kenya National Dialogue and Reconciliation following the 2008 post-election violence; and, lastly, an inductive comparison of these two peace processes.",
keywords = "Den Internationale Straffedomstol, Retsligg{\o}relse af politik, Fredsprocesser, Kenya, Uganda, Lord's Resistance Army, The International Criminal Court, Judicialisation of politics, Peace Processes, Kenya, Uganda, Lord's Resistance Army, Conflict Resolution",
author = "Gissel, {Line Engbo}",
year = "2014",
month = "2",
language = "English",
isbn = "978-87-7335-181-9",
publisher = "Forlaget Politica",

}

Judicialising Peace : The International Criminal Court's Impact on Political Settlements in Kenya and Uganda. / Gissel, Line Engbo.

Aarhus : Forlaget Politica, 2014. 512 p.

Research output: Book/ReportPh.D. thesisResearch

TY - BOOK

T1 - Judicialising Peace

T2 - The International Criminal Court's Impact on Political Settlements in Kenya and Uganda

AU - Gissel, Line Engbo

PY - 2014/2

Y1 - 2014/2

N2 - Analysing two peace processes in Kenya and Uganda, this dissertation argues that what matters to peace processes that experience an ICC intervention is the timing and level of ICC involvement as well as the interpretation of particular aspects of the Rome Statute by key ICC officials.This argument centres on the notion of international legalisation. It derives from four analyses: A deconstruction of the idea of international Justice that animates the ICC and its constituency; interpretive process analyses of the Juba Peace Talks between the Ugandan government and the Lord's Resistance Army as well as the Kenya National Dialogue and Reconciliation following the 2008 post-election violence; and, lastly, an inductive comparison of these two peace processes.

AB - Analysing two peace processes in Kenya and Uganda, this dissertation argues that what matters to peace processes that experience an ICC intervention is the timing and level of ICC involvement as well as the interpretation of particular aspects of the Rome Statute by key ICC officials.This argument centres on the notion of international legalisation. It derives from four analyses: A deconstruction of the idea of international Justice that animates the ICC and its constituency; interpretive process analyses of the Juba Peace Talks between the Ugandan government and the Lord's Resistance Army as well as the Kenya National Dialogue and Reconciliation following the 2008 post-election violence; and, lastly, an inductive comparison of these two peace processes.

KW - Den Internationale Straffedomstol

KW - Retsliggørelse af politik

KW - Fredsprocesser

KW - Kenya

KW - Uganda

KW - Lord's Resistance Army

KW - The International Criminal Court

KW - Judicialisation of politics

KW - Peace Processes

KW - Kenya

KW - Uganda

KW - Lord's Resistance Army

KW - Conflict Resolution

M3 - Ph.D. thesis

SN - 978-87-7335-181-9

BT - Judicialising Peace

PB - Forlaget Politica

CY - Aarhus

ER -