Islamic Mobility

Car Culture in Modern Malaysia

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

In a modern and respectable middle-class suburb outside Kuala Lumpur, the overtness of cars evokes intense speculation about the nature of the make-up of covert middle-class homes and the formation of Malay Muslim identities more generally. I argue that the more ‘Islamic’ cultures of consumption assert themselves in modern Malaysia, the more the growing Malay Muslim middle class is split between desiring cars as positional commodities, on the one hand, and claims for piety through consumption, on the other. An important question is how Malay Muslim middle-class identity is practised through divergent forms of car consumption. Discussing ethnographic material from fieldwork among Malay middle-class families, I show how car consumption generates not only distinctions, practices and moral symbolic boundaries but also ideas about Islam, nation and excess.
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Consumer Culture
Volume16
Issue number2
Pages (from-to)572–591
ISSN1469-5405
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2016

Cite this

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title = "Islamic Mobility: Car Culture in Modern Malaysia",
abstract = "In a modern and respectable middle-class suburb outside Kuala Lumpur, the overtness of cars evokes intense speculation about the nature of the make-up of covert middle-class homes and the formation of Malay Muslim identities more generally. I argue that the more ‘Islamic’ cultures of consumption assert themselves in modern Malaysia, the more the growing Malay Muslim middle class is split between desiring cars as positional commodities, on the one hand, and claims for piety through consumption, on the other. An important question is how Malay Muslim middle-class identity is practised through divergent forms of car consumption. Discussing ethnographic material from fieldwork among Malay middle-class families, I show how car consumption generates not only distinctions, practices and moral symbolic boundaries but also ideas about Islam, nation and excess.",
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Islamic Mobility : Car Culture in Modern Malaysia. / Fischer, Johan.

In: Journal of Consumer Culture, Vol. 16, No. 2, 01.07.2016, p. 572–591.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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AB - In a modern and respectable middle-class suburb outside Kuala Lumpur, the overtness of cars evokes intense speculation about the nature of the make-up of covert middle-class homes and the formation of Malay Muslim identities more generally. I argue that the more ‘Islamic’ cultures of consumption assert themselves in modern Malaysia, the more the growing Malay Muslim middle class is split between desiring cars as positional commodities, on the one hand, and claims for piety through consumption, on the other. An important question is how Malay Muslim middle-class identity is practised through divergent forms of car consumption. Discussing ethnographic material from fieldwork among Malay middle-class families, I show how car consumption generates not only distinctions, practices and moral symbolic boundaries but also ideas about Islam, nation and excess.

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