Indigenous housing and health in the Canadian North: Revisiting cultural safety

Julia Christensen

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

In this article, I explore the relationship between housing, home and health amongst Indigenous homeless people living in the Canadian North. In particular, I examine the ways in which Indigenous homemaking practices conflict with housing policy, and exacerbate individual pathways to homelessness. I argue that integral components in northern Indigenous conceptualizations of home and, in turn, health are not only unrecognized in housing policy, but actively discouraged. The potential for homemaking to inform health and housing policy speaks to the relevance of cultural safety not only to Indigenous health services, but also to a comprehensive framing of Indigenous health.
Translated title of the contributionIndigenous housing and health in the Canadian North: Revisiting cultural safety
Original languageEnglish
JournalHealth & Place
Volume40
Pages (from-to)83-90
Number of pages8
ISSN1353-8292
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

Keywords

  • Indigenous homelessness
  • cultural safety
  • trauma
  • social determinants
  • housing
  • home

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