Fusion cuisine: A functional approach to interdisciplinary cooking in journalism studies

Chris Peters, Marcel Broersma

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

JJournalism studies as an academic field is characterized by multidisciplinarity. Focusing on one object of study, journalism and the news, it established itself by integrating and synthesizing approaches from established disciplines – a tendency that lives on today. This constant gaze to the outside for conceptual inspiration and methodological tools lends itself to a journalism studies that is a fusion cuisine of media, communication, and related scholarship. However, what happens when this object becomes as fragmented and multifaceted as the ways we study it? This essay addresses the challenge of multiplicity in journalism studies by introducing an audience-centred, functional approach to scholarship. We argue this approach encourages the creative intellectual advancements afforded by interdisciplinary experimental cooking while respecting the classical intellectual questions that helped define the culinary tradition of journalism studies in the first place. In so doing, we offer a recipe for journalism studies fusion cooking that: (1) considers technological change (audiences’ diets), (2) analyses institutional change (audiences’ supermarket of information), and (3) evaluates journalism’s societal and democratic impact (audiences’ cuisines and health).
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournalism
Volume20
Issue number5
Pages (from-to)660-669
ISSN1464-8849
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2019

Cite this

@article{17f3e8483619427c8060c7a948c632eb,
title = "Fusion cuisine: A functional approach to interdisciplinary cooking in journalism studies",
abstract = "JJournalism studies as an academic field is characterized by multidisciplinarity. Focusing on one object of study, journalism and the news, it established itself by integrating and synthesizing approaches from established disciplines – a tendency that lives on today. This constant gaze to the outside for conceptual inspiration and methodological tools lends itself to a journalism studies that is a fusion cuisine of media, communication, and related scholarship. However, what happens when this object becomes as fragmented and multifaceted as the ways we study it? This essay addresses the challenge of multiplicity in journalism studies by introducing an audience-centred, functional approach to scholarship. We argue this approach encourages the creative intellectual advancements afforded by interdisciplinary experimental cooking while respecting the classical intellectual questions that helped define the culinary tradition of journalism studies in the first place. In so doing, we offer a recipe for journalism studies fusion cooking that: (1) considers technological change (audiences’ diets), (2) analyses institutional change (audiences’ supermarket of information), and (3) evaluates journalism’s societal and democratic impact (audiences’ cuisines and health).",
author = "Chris Peters and Marcel Broersma",
year = "2019",
month = "5",
doi = "10.1177/1464884918760671",
language = "English",
volume = "20",
pages = "660--669",
journal = "Journalism",
issn = "1464-8849",
publisher = "SAGE Publications",
number = "5",

}

Fusion cuisine : A functional approach to interdisciplinary cooking in journalism studies. / Peters, Chris; Broersma, Marcel.

In: Journalism, Vol. 20, No. 5, 05.2019, p. 660-669.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Fusion cuisine

T2 - A functional approach to interdisciplinary cooking in journalism studies

AU - Peters, Chris

AU - Broersma, Marcel

PY - 2019/5

Y1 - 2019/5

N2 - JJournalism studies as an academic field is characterized by multidisciplinarity. Focusing on one object of study, journalism and the news, it established itself by integrating and synthesizing approaches from established disciplines – a tendency that lives on today. This constant gaze to the outside for conceptual inspiration and methodological tools lends itself to a journalism studies that is a fusion cuisine of media, communication, and related scholarship. However, what happens when this object becomes as fragmented and multifaceted as the ways we study it? This essay addresses the challenge of multiplicity in journalism studies by introducing an audience-centred, functional approach to scholarship. We argue this approach encourages the creative intellectual advancements afforded by interdisciplinary experimental cooking while respecting the classical intellectual questions that helped define the culinary tradition of journalism studies in the first place. In so doing, we offer a recipe for journalism studies fusion cooking that: (1) considers technological change (audiences’ diets), (2) analyses institutional change (audiences’ supermarket of information), and (3) evaluates journalism’s societal and democratic impact (audiences’ cuisines and health).

AB - JJournalism studies as an academic field is characterized by multidisciplinarity. Focusing on one object of study, journalism and the news, it established itself by integrating and synthesizing approaches from established disciplines – a tendency that lives on today. This constant gaze to the outside for conceptual inspiration and methodological tools lends itself to a journalism studies that is a fusion cuisine of media, communication, and related scholarship. However, what happens when this object becomes as fragmented and multifaceted as the ways we study it? This essay addresses the challenge of multiplicity in journalism studies by introducing an audience-centred, functional approach to scholarship. We argue this approach encourages the creative intellectual advancements afforded by interdisciplinary experimental cooking while respecting the classical intellectual questions that helped define the culinary tradition of journalism studies in the first place. In so doing, we offer a recipe for journalism studies fusion cooking that: (1) considers technological change (audiences’ diets), (2) analyses institutional change (audiences’ supermarket of information), and (3) evaluates journalism’s societal and democratic impact (audiences’ cuisines and health).

U2 - 10.1177/1464884918760671

DO - 10.1177/1464884918760671

M3 - Journal article

VL - 20

SP - 660

EP - 669

JO - Journalism

JF - Journalism

SN - 1464-8849

IS - 5

ER -