John Dewey demokrati og politikerde - da og nu

Adam Travis Stoltenberg, Alan Bloc'h Eeg Justesen, Sara Preuss Justesen, Schannie Nyholm & Troels Styrbjørn Hummelgren

Studenteropgave: Semesterprojekt

Abstrakt

The project entails a detailed analysis of American Philosopher John Dewey’s theories regarding the ideal democracy, in terms of a critical view of the Danish democracy in idea and function. We are focused on whether his ideas about democracy can be used in a modern context in Denmark in a meaningful way. A focus held throughout the project is how politikerlede, a Danish term entailing the layman’s dissatisfaction, discontent and hostility towards the political system and public officials, is viewed by Dewey. We conclude that while Dewey’s ideas may be dated, and while capitalism and the general societal development are ever-changing, Dewey’s ideas still carry a lot of weight in terms of understanding the Danish democracy and its faults. We have also drawn a perspective to the Danish author Søren Mau, and his book Hæv Stemmen!, as we wondered how a contemporary analysis of the elections for parliament in 2015, where Mau suggested non-voting as a political means to achieve a more democratic society, related to John Dewey’s ideas of the ideal democracy, as well as his method for ascertaining it. We found that while there were a few differences between the two authors’ world-view, they were generally in agreement in terms of their view on humans, capitalism, the parliament and its power. The two authors disagreed in terms of voting being an effective mechanism towards realizing their respective democratic ideal. Dewey did not explicitly endorse non-voting, though he did not condemn those who did not vote in a non-democratic state, as well as the progressive potential of politikerlede.

UddannelserBasis - Humanistisk Bacheloruddannelse, (Bachelor uddannelse) Basis
SprogDansk
Udgivelsesdato21 dec. 2015
VejledereMartin Ejsing Christensen

Emneord

  • Mau
  • Demokrati
  • Stemme
  • Dewey
  • Hæv Stemmen
  • The Public and its problems
  • Politikerlede