Visibly ethnically mixed couples:

An overlooked racialised category in psychosocial service provision in Denmark

Publikation: KonferencebidragKonferenceabstrakt til konferenceForskningpeer review

Resumé

Visibly ethnically mixed couples: An overlooked racialised category in psychosocial service provision in Denmark
By Rashmi singla
This paper deals with the experiences of the ethnically mixed couples and relevant service provision in Denmark. Despite the increasing numbers of the mixed couples, their own voices are hardly heard due to historical silencing of mixedness and colorblind ideology.
Ten in-depth interviews and two case studies* of couples across ethnic/religious borders – one native Danish partner and the other originating from India/ Pakistan, form the presentation’s empirical basis. The theoretical framework transcends the two strands of research focusing on either the family cultural practices or the structural aspects. Cultural psychology forms the background, foregrounded by a combination of intersectionality, transnationalism and the data is thematically analysed.
The results indicate that mixed couples are subjected to discrimination processes, including gaze as ‘the others’. Awareness/racial literacy and indifference are the two dominant strategies of coping with these. The former is illustrated through an awareness of these processes in domains such as the labour market; the stereotypical views of family members; curious questions, while marginalising the family history; overlooking family traditions at dynamic level; the majority partner not noticing unequal power and privilege discourses illustrate the latter.
Overlooking the gaze and the other discrimination processes in the short term may be an adaptive strategy in a racist society, but over time such strategies can precipitate conflicted identities -detrimental to both the partners and the society.
There is no official acceptance of mixedness, as in Denmark’s statistics - ethnically mixed children are categorised as “Danes” and a glaring lack of relevant services for mixed couples and their children, which implies institutional racism - collective failure of organisation to provide appropriate and professional service to people because of their colour and (mixed) ethnic origin. Lastly, suggestions for mental health promotion and psychosocial intervention for ethnically mixed couples and their children experiencing problems are proposed.

*Singla, R. (2015) “Intermarriage, Mixed Parenting, Promoting Mental Health and Wellbeing: Crossover Love Basingstoke, Palgrave Macmillan

Word count: 298


OriginalsprogDansk
Publikationsdato1 nov. 2019
StatusUdgivet - 1 nov. 2019
BegivenhedTracing Social Problems and Racialization in Europe: Social Control, Violence and Ethnic others - Roskilde Universitet, Roskilde, Danmark
Varighed: 4 nov. 20195 nov. 2019
https://events.ruc.dk/racialization/the-event.html

Konference

KonferenceTracing Social Problems and Racialization in Europe
LokationRoskilde Universitet
LandDanmark
ByRoskilde
Periode04/11/201905/11/2019
Internetadresse

Citer dette

Singla, R. (2019). Visibly ethnically mixed couples: An overlooked racialised category in psychosocial service provision in Denmark . Abstract fra Tracing Social Problems and Racialization in Europe, Roskilde, Danmark.
Singla, Rashmi. / Visibly ethnically mixed couples: An overlooked racialised category in psychosocial service provision in Denmark . Abstract fra Tracing Social Problems and Racialization in Europe, Roskilde, Danmark.
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abstract = "Visibly ethnically mixed couples: An overlooked racialised category in psychosocial service provision in Denmark By Rashmi singlaThis paper deals with the experiences of the ethnically mixed couples and relevant service provision in Denmark. Despite the increasing numbers of the mixed couples, their own voices are hardly heard due to historical silencing of mixedness and colorblind ideology. Ten in-depth interviews and two case studies* of couples across ethnic/religious borders – one native Danish partner and the other originating from India/ Pakistan, form the presentation’s empirical basis. The theoretical framework transcends the two strands of research focusing on either the family cultural practices or the structural aspects. Cultural psychology forms the background, foregrounded by a combination of intersectionality, transnationalism and the data is thematically analysed.The results indicate that mixed couples are subjected to discrimination processes, including gaze as ‘the others’. Awareness/racial literacy and indifference are the two dominant strategies of coping with these. The former is illustrated through an awareness of these processes in domains such as the labour market; the stereotypical views of family members; curious questions, while marginalising the family history; overlooking family traditions at dynamic level; the majority partner not noticing unequal power and privilege discourses illustrate the latter. Overlooking the gaze and the other discrimination processes in the short term may be an adaptive strategy in a racist society, but over time such strategies can precipitate conflicted identities -detrimental to both the partners and the society. There is no official acceptance of mixedness, as in Denmark’s statistics - ethnically mixed children are categorised as “Danes” and a glaring lack of relevant services for mixed couples and their children, which implies institutional racism - collective failure of organisation to provide appropriate and professional service to people because of their colour and (mixed) ethnic origin. Lastly, suggestions for mental health promotion and psychosocial intervention for ethnically mixed couples and their children experiencing problems are proposed.*Singla, R. (2015) “Intermarriage, Mixed Parenting, Promoting Mental Health and Wellbeing: Crossover Love Basingstoke, Palgrave MacmillanWord count: 298",
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Singla, R 2019, 'Visibly ethnically mixed couples: An overlooked racialised category in psychosocial service provision in Denmark ' Tracing Social Problems and Racialization in Europe, Roskilde, Danmark, 04/11/2019 - 05/11/2019, .

Visibly ethnically mixed couples: An overlooked racialised category in psychosocial service provision in Denmark . / Singla, Rashmi.

2019. Abstract fra Tracing Social Problems and Racialization in Europe, Roskilde, Danmark.

Publikation: KonferencebidragKonferenceabstrakt til konferenceForskningpeer review

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Singla R. Visibly ethnically mixed couples: An overlooked racialised category in psychosocial service provision in Denmark . 2019. Abstract fra Tracing Social Problems and Racialization in Europe, Roskilde, Danmark.