Towards a Classification of Interrogative Speech Acts

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

In John Searle’s original taxonomy of types of illocutionary acts (Searle 1969) he points out that some kinds of illocutionary acts are special cases of other kinds, giving the example that questions are in fact special cases of requests. In that way, a “real question” is a request for information that the sender does not already possess, whereas an “exam question” is a request for information that the sender has already access to. This paper aims to take this rudimentary analysis some steps further and attempt a taxonomy of interrogative speech acts based on sets of more specific preparatory conditions such as “sender expects / does not expect response” and “sender knows / does not know the requested information”. The paper shows that a system of these sets of preparatory conditions can generate illocutionary definitions of a range of different types of interrogative speech acts.

Keywords: Illocutionary acts, Speech acts, Taxonomy, Preparatory conditions
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftScandinavian Studies in Language
ISSN1904-7843
StatusAccepteret/In press - 2020

Citer dette

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abstract = "In John Searle’s original taxonomy of types of illocutionary acts (Searle 1969) he points out that some kinds of illocutionary acts are special cases of other kinds, giving the example that questions are in fact special cases of requests. In that way, a “real question” is a request for information that the sender does not already possess, whereas an “exam question” is a request for information that the sender has already access to. This paper aims to take this rudimentary analysis some steps further and attempt a taxonomy of interrogative speech acts based on sets of more specific preparatory conditions such as “sender expects / does not expect response” and “sender knows / does not know the requested information”. The paper shows that a system of these sets of preparatory conditions can generate illocutionary definitions of a range of different types of interrogative speech acts.Keywords: Illocutionary acts, Speech acts, Taxonomy, Preparatory conditions",
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Towards a Classification of Interrogative Speech Acts. / Nielsen, Niels Møller.

I: Scandinavian Studies in Language, 2020.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Towards a Classification of Interrogative Speech Acts

AU - Nielsen, Niels Møller

PY - 2020

Y1 - 2020

N2 - In John Searle’s original taxonomy of types of illocutionary acts (Searle 1969) he points out that some kinds of illocutionary acts are special cases of other kinds, giving the example that questions are in fact special cases of requests. In that way, a “real question” is a request for information that the sender does not already possess, whereas an “exam question” is a request for information that the sender has already access to. This paper aims to take this rudimentary analysis some steps further and attempt a taxonomy of interrogative speech acts based on sets of more specific preparatory conditions such as “sender expects / does not expect response” and “sender knows / does not know the requested information”. The paper shows that a system of these sets of preparatory conditions can generate illocutionary definitions of a range of different types of interrogative speech acts.Keywords: Illocutionary acts, Speech acts, Taxonomy, Preparatory conditions

AB - In John Searle’s original taxonomy of types of illocutionary acts (Searle 1969) he points out that some kinds of illocutionary acts are special cases of other kinds, giving the example that questions are in fact special cases of requests. In that way, a “real question” is a request for information that the sender does not already possess, whereas an “exam question” is a request for information that the sender has already access to. This paper aims to take this rudimentary analysis some steps further and attempt a taxonomy of interrogative speech acts based on sets of more specific preparatory conditions such as “sender expects / does not expect response” and “sender knows / does not know the requested information”. The paper shows that a system of these sets of preparatory conditions can generate illocutionary definitions of a range of different types of interrogative speech acts.Keywords: Illocutionary acts, Speech acts, Taxonomy, Preparatory conditions

M3 - Journal article

JO - Scandinavian Studies in Language

JF - Scandinavian Studies in Language

SN - 1904-7843

ER -