The state of social science research on antimicrobial resistance

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Resumé

This paper investigates the genealogy of social science research into antimicrobial resistance (AMR) by piecing together the bibliometric characteristics of this branch of research. Drawing on the Web of Science as the primary database, the analysis shows that while academic interest in AMR has increased substantially over the last few years, social science research continues to constitute a negligible share of total academic contributions. More in-depth network analysis of citations and bibliometric couplings suggests how the impact of social science research on the scientific discourse on AMR is both peripheral and spread thin. We conclude that this limited social science engagement is puzzling considering the clear academic and practical demand and the many existing interdisciplinary outlets.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftSocial Science & Medicine
Vol/bind242
ISSN0277-9536
DOI
StatusE-pub ahead of print - 11 okt. 2019

Citer dette

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title = "The state of social science research on antimicrobial resistance",
abstract = "This paper investigates the genealogy of social science research into antimicrobial resistance (AMR) by piecing together the bibliometric characteristics of this branch of research. Drawing on the Web of Science as the primary database, the analysis shows that while academic interest in AMR has increased substantially over the last few years, social science research continues to constitute a negligible share of total academic contributions. More in-depth network analysis of citations and bibliometric couplings suggests how the impact of social science research on the scientific discourse on AMR is both peripheral and spread thin. We conclude that this limited social science engagement is puzzling considering the clear academic and practical demand and the many existing interdisciplinary outlets.",
author = "Frid-Nielsen, {Snorre Sylvester} and Olivier Rubin and Erik Baekkeskov",
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The state of social science research on antimicrobial resistance. / Frid-Nielsen, Snorre Sylvester; Rubin, Olivier; Baekkeskov, Erik.

I: Social Science & Medicine, Bind 242, 11.10.2019.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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