The Revival of Non-Traditional State Actors' Interests in Africa

Does it matter for policy autonomy?

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

Africa’s external relations are currently undergoing major changes. Non-traditional state actors like China and India are reviving their ties with African economies and thereby affecting power relations between African states and traditional partners. Meanwhile, high commodity prices and improved credit ratings make external finance available for African governments. This article examines how non-traditional state actors affect the possibility of African governments setting and funding their own development priorities. It argues that while the current situation may increase the policy autonomy for African economies this is largely a consequence of the increased availability of external finance - and not just from non-traditional state actors.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftDevelopment Policy Review
Vol/bind30
Udgave nummer6
Sider (fra-til)703-718
ISSN0950-6764
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2012

Citer dette

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abstract = "Africa’s external relations are currently undergoing major changes. Non-traditional state actors like China and India are reviving their ties with African economies and thereby affecting power relations between African states and traditional partners. Meanwhile, high commodity prices and improved credit ratings make external finance available for African governments. This article examines how non-traditional state actors affect the possibility of African governments setting and funding their own development priorities. It argues that while the current situation may increase the policy autonomy for African economies this is largely a consequence of the increased availability of external finance - and not just from non-traditional state actors.",
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The Revival of Non-Traditional State Actors' Interests in Africa : Does it matter for policy autonomy? / Kragelund, Peter.

I: Development Policy Review, Bind 30, Nr. 6, 2012, s. 703-718.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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