Social imaginaries, sperm and whiteness: Race and reproduction in British media

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

This article analyses narratives about so-called Viking babies and Viking sperm. Over the last few years an increasing number of British single women and lesbian couples have been creating families by becoming pregnant with Danish donor sperm, termed ‘Viking sperm’. Through analyses of British media coverage of these new families, this article explores contemporary constructions of race, especially whiteness, and gender, and shows how imaginaries of Vikings, genes and white superiority circulate in British media and among British mothers. The article illustrates how a racial discourse, which often is associated with nineteenth-century racial science, can surface in contemporary times. Yet the article also reveals how colonial and racial legacies of whiteness tend to be erased from narratives of fertility, as the (neoliberal) focus on the individual as consumer frames reproduction as individual (free) choices distant from a colonial past.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftJournal of Intercultural Studies
Vol/bind38
Udgave nummer2
Sider (fra-til)123-138
Antal sider16
ISSN0725-6868
DOI
StatusUdgivet - mar. 2017

Citer dette

@article{aba9ede9059f420288a25062d8469ef1,
title = "Social imaginaries, sperm and whiteness: Race and reproduction in British media",
abstract = "This article analyses narratives about so-called Viking babies and Viking sperm. Over the last few years an increasing number of British single women and lesbian couples have been creating families by becoming pregnant with Danish donor sperm, termed ‘Viking sperm’. Through analyses of British media coverage of these new families, this article explores contemporary constructions of race, especially whiteness, and gender, and shows how imaginaries of Vikings, genes and white superiority circulate in British media and among British mothers. The article illustrates how a racial discourse, which often is associated with nineteenth-century racial science, can surface in contemporary times. Yet the article also reveals how colonial and racial legacies of whiteness tend to be erased from narratives of fertility, as the (neoliberal) focus on the individual as consumer frames reproduction as individual (free) choices distant from a colonial past.",
author = "Rikke Andreassen",
year = "2017",
month = "3",
doi = "10.1080/07256868.2017.1289906",
language = "English",
volume = "38",
pages = "123--138",
journal = "Journal of Intercultural Studies",
issn = "0725-6868",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "2",

}

Social imaginaries, sperm and whiteness : Race and reproduction in British media. / Andreassen, Rikke.

I: Journal of Intercultural Studies, Bind 38, Nr. 2, 03.2017, s. 123-138.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Social imaginaries, sperm and whiteness

T2 - Race and reproduction in British media

AU - Andreassen, Rikke

PY - 2017/3

Y1 - 2017/3

N2 - This article analyses narratives about so-called Viking babies and Viking sperm. Over the last few years an increasing number of British single women and lesbian couples have been creating families by becoming pregnant with Danish donor sperm, termed ‘Viking sperm’. Through analyses of British media coverage of these new families, this article explores contemporary constructions of race, especially whiteness, and gender, and shows how imaginaries of Vikings, genes and white superiority circulate in British media and among British mothers. The article illustrates how a racial discourse, which often is associated with nineteenth-century racial science, can surface in contemporary times. Yet the article also reveals how colonial and racial legacies of whiteness tend to be erased from narratives of fertility, as the (neoliberal) focus on the individual as consumer frames reproduction as individual (free) choices distant from a colonial past.

AB - This article analyses narratives about so-called Viking babies and Viking sperm. Over the last few years an increasing number of British single women and lesbian couples have been creating families by becoming pregnant with Danish donor sperm, termed ‘Viking sperm’. Through analyses of British media coverage of these new families, this article explores contemporary constructions of race, especially whiteness, and gender, and shows how imaginaries of Vikings, genes and white superiority circulate in British media and among British mothers. The article illustrates how a racial discourse, which often is associated with nineteenth-century racial science, can surface in contemporary times. Yet the article also reveals how colonial and racial legacies of whiteness tend to be erased from narratives of fertility, as the (neoliberal) focus on the individual as consumer frames reproduction as individual (free) choices distant from a colonial past.

U2 - 10.1080/07256868.2017.1289906

DO - 10.1080/07256868.2017.1289906

M3 - Journal article

VL - 38

SP - 123

EP - 138

JO - Journal of Intercultural Studies

JF - Journal of Intercultural Studies

SN - 0725-6868

IS - 2

ER -