Size matter!

A choice architectural field experiment in reducing food waste

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

    Resumé

    Objectives
    We examined how a reduction in plate size would affect the amount of food waste from leftovers in a field experiment at a standing lunch for 220 CEOs.

    Methods
    A standing lunch for 220 CEOs in the Danish Opera House was arranged to feature two identical buffets with plates of two different sizes. One buffet featured standard sized plates that served as control (standard size as provided by the caterer, 27cm). A second buffet featured smaller sized plates (24cm) that served as the intervention. After the lunch concluded (30 minutes), all leftover food was collected in designated trash bags according to size of plates and weighed in bulk.

    Results
    Those eating from smaller plates (n=145) left significantly less food to waste (aver. 14,8g) than participants eating from standard plates (n=75) (aver. 20g) amounting to a reduction of 25,8%.

    Conclusions
    Our field experiment tests the hypothesis that a decrease in the size of food plates may lead to significant reductions in food waste from buffets. It supports and extends the set of circumstances in which a recent experiment found that reduced dinner plates in a hotel chain lead to reduced quantities of leftovers.
    OriginalsprogEngelsk
    TidsskriftMenu: Journal of Food and Hospitality Research
    Vol/bind4
    Sider (fra-til)11-15
    Antal sider4
    ISSN2275-5748
    StatusUdgivet - 2015

    Citer dette

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    title = "Size matter!: A choice architectural field experiment in reducing food waste",
    abstract = "ObjectivesWe examined how a reduction in plate size would affect the amount of food waste from leftovers in a field experiment at a standing lunch for 220 CEOs.MethodsA standing lunch for 220 CEOs in the Danish Opera House was arranged to feature two identical buffets with plates of two different sizes. One buffet featured standard sized plates that served as control (standard size as provided by the caterer, 27cm). A second buffet featured smaller sized plates (24cm) that served as the intervention. After the lunch concluded (30 minutes), all leftover food was collected in designated trash bags according to size of plates and weighed in bulk.ResultsThose eating from smaller plates (n=145) left significantly less food to waste (aver. 14,8g) than participants eating from standard plates (n=75) (aver. 20g) amounting to a reduction of 25,8{\%}.ConclusionsOur field experiment tests the hypothesis that a decrease in the size of food plates may lead to significant reductions in food waste from buffets. It supports and extends the set of circumstances in which a recent experiment found that reduced dinner plates in a hotel chain lead to reduced quantities of leftovers.",
    keywords = "choice architecture, nudge, behavioural science, experiment, food waste",
    author = "Hansen, {Pelle Guldborg} and Jespersen, {Andreas Maal{\o}e} and Skov, {Laurits Rhoden}",
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    journal = "Menu: Journal of Food and Hospitality Research",
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    publisher = "the Institut Paul Bocuse Research Centre, Ch{\^a}teau du Vivier, 69130 ECULLY, FRANCE",

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    Size matter! A choice architectural field experiment in reducing food waste. / Hansen, Pelle Guldborg; Jespersen, Andreas Maaløe; Skov, Laurits Rhoden.

    I: Menu: Journal of Food and Hospitality Research, Bind 4, 2015, s. 11-15.

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Size matter!

    T2 - A choice architectural field experiment in reducing food waste

    AU - Hansen, Pelle Guldborg

    AU - Jespersen, Andreas Maaløe

    AU - Skov, Laurits Rhoden

    PY - 2015

    Y1 - 2015

    N2 - ObjectivesWe examined how a reduction in plate size would affect the amount of food waste from leftovers in a field experiment at a standing lunch for 220 CEOs.MethodsA standing lunch for 220 CEOs in the Danish Opera House was arranged to feature two identical buffets with plates of two different sizes. One buffet featured standard sized plates that served as control (standard size as provided by the caterer, 27cm). A second buffet featured smaller sized plates (24cm) that served as the intervention. After the lunch concluded (30 minutes), all leftover food was collected in designated trash bags according to size of plates and weighed in bulk.ResultsThose eating from smaller plates (n=145) left significantly less food to waste (aver. 14,8g) than participants eating from standard plates (n=75) (aver. 20g) amounting to a reduction of 25,8%.ConclusionsOur field experiment tests the hypothesis that a decrease in the size of food plates may lead to significant reductions in food waste from buffets. It supports and extends the set of circumstances in which a recent experiment found that reduced dinner plates in a hotel chain lead to reduced quantities of leftovers.

    AB - ObjectivesWe examined how a reduction in plate size would affect the amount of food waste from leftovers in a field experiment at a standing lunch for 220 CEOs.MethodsA standing lunch for 220 CEOs in the Danish Opera House was arranged to feature two identical buffets with plates of two different sizes. One buffet featured standard sized plates that served as control (standard size as provided by the caterer, 27cm). A second buffet featured smaller sized plates (24cm) that served as the intervention. After the lunch concluded (30 minutes), all leftover food was collected in designated trash bags according to size of plates and weighed in bulk.ResultsThose eating from smaller plates (n=145) left significantly less food to waste (aver. 14,8g) than participants eating from standard plates (n=75) (aver. 20g) amounting to a reduction of 25,8%.ConclusionsOur field experiment tests the hypothesis that a decrease in the size of food plates may lead to significant reductions in food waste from buffets. It supports and extends the set of circumstances in which a recent experiment found that reduced dinner plates in a hotel chain lead to reduced quantities of leftovers.

    KW - choice architecture

    KW - nudge

    KW - behavioural science

    KW - experiment

    KW - food waste

    UR - http://recherche.institutpaulbocuse.com/en/publications/publications-4464.kjsp

    M3 - Journal article

    VL - 4

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    JO - Menu: Journal of Food and Hospitality Research

    JF - Menu: Journal of Food and Hospitality Research

    SN - 2275-5748

    ER -