Pregnancy exposure to wind turbine noise and adverse birth outcomes

a nationwide cohort study

Aslak H. Poulsen, Ole Raaschou-Nielsen, Alfredo Peña, Andrea N. Hahmann, Rikke Baastrup Nordsborg, Matthias Ketzel, Jørgen Brandt, Mette Sørensen

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

Noise from wind turbines (WTs) is reported as more annoying than traffic noise at similar levels, raising concerns as to whether WT noise (WTN) may negatively affect health, as reported for traffic noise. We aimed to investigate whether residential WTN is associated with adverse birth outcomes. Based on national registries, we identified all Danish dwellings situated within ≤ 20 wt heights radius and a random selection of 25% of dwellings situated within 20–40 wt heights radius of a WT. We identified 135,795 pregnant women living in the dwellings from 1982 to 2013, and collected information on gestational age and birth weight from a national birth registry. Using data on WT type and simulated hourly wind at each WT, we estimated hourly outdoor and low frequency (LF) indoor WTN at the dwellings of the pregnant women and aggregated as mean nighttime WTN during pregnancy. We used logistic regression with adjustment for individual and area-level covariates for the analyses. We did not find evidence suggesting that mean pregnancy or trimester-specific exposure to outdoor or indoor LF WTN were associated with any of the three adverse birth outcomes investigated: preterm birth (n = 13,003), term small for gestational age (n = 12,220) or term low birth weight (n = 1127). However, the number of cases in the highest exposure categories of ≥ 42 dB outdoor WTN or ≥ 15 dB indoor LF WTN were low for all outcomes (n between 0 and 31). The present study does not support an association between nighttime WTN and adverse birth outcomes. However, there were few cases in the high exposure groups and the results call for reproduction.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftEnvironmental Research
Vol/bind167
Sider (fra-til)770-775
ISSN0013-9351
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2018

Citer dette

Poulsen, A. H., Raaschou-Nielsen, O., Peña, A., Hahmann, A. N., Nordsborg, R. B., Ketzel, M., ... Sørensen, M. (2018). Pregnancy exposure to wind turbine noise and adverse birth outcomes: a nationwide cohort study. Environmental Research, 167, 770-775. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envres.2018.09.011
Poulsen, Aslak H. ; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole ; Peña, Alfredo ; Hahmann, Andrea N. ; Nordsborg, Rikke Baastrup ; Ketzel, Matthias ; Brandt, Jørgen ; Sørensen, Mette. / Pregnancy exposure to wind turbine noise and adverse birth outcomes : a nationwide cohort study. I: Environmental Research. 2018 ; Bind 167. s. 770-775.
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title = "Pregnancy exposure to wind turbine noise and adverse birth outcomes: a nationwide cohort study",
abstract = "Noise from wind turbines (WTs) is reported as more annoying than traffic noise at similar levels, raising concerns as to whether WT noise (WTN) may negatively affect health, as reported for traffic noise. We aimed to investigate whether residential WTN is associated with adverse birth outcomes. Based on national registries, we identified all Danish dwellings situated within ≤ 20 wt heights radius and a random selection of 25{\%} of dwellings situated within 20–40 wt heights radius of a WT. We identified 135,795 pregnant women living in the dwellings from 1982 to 2013, and collected information on gestational age and birth weight from a national birth registry. Using data on WT type and simulated hourly wind at each WT, we estimated hourly outdoor and low frequency (LF) indoor WTN at the dwellings of the pregnant women and aggregated as mean nighttime WTN during pregnancy. We used logistic regression with adjustment for individual and area-level covariates for the analyses. We did not find evidence suggesting that mean pregnancy or trimester-specific exposure to outdoor or indoor LF WTN were associated with any of the three adverse birth outcomes investigated: preterm birth (n = 13,003), term small for gestational age (n = 12,220) or term low birth weight (n = 1127). However, the number of cases in the highest exposure categories of ≥ 42 dB outdoor WTN or ≥ 15 dB indoor LF WTN were low for all outcomes (n between 0 and 31). The present study does not support an association between nighttime WTN and adverse birth outcomes. However, there were few cases in the high exposure groups and the results call for reproduction.",
author = "Poulsen, {Aslak H.} and Ole Raaschou-Nielsen and Alfredo Pe{\~n}a and Hahmann, {Andrea N.} and Nordsborg, {Rikke Baastrup} and Matthias Ketzel and J{\o}rgen Brandt and Mette S{\o}rensen",
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Poulsen, AH, Raaschou-Nielsen, O, Peña, A, Hahmann, AN, Nordsborg, RB, Ketzel, M, Brandt, J & Sørensen, M 2018, 'Pregnancy exposure to wind turbine noise and adverse birth outcomes: a nationwide cohort study', Environmental Research, bind 167, s. 770-775. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envres.2018.09.011

Pregnancy exposure to wind turbine noise and adverse birth outcomes : a nationwide cohort study. / Poulsen, Aslak H.; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole; Peña, Alfredo; Hahmann, Andrea N.; Nordsborg, Rikke Baastrup; Ketzel, Matthias; Brandt, Jørgen; Sørensen, Mette.

I: Environmental Research, Bind 167, 2018, s. 770-775.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Pregnancy exposure to wind turbine noise and adverse birth outcomes

T2 - a nationwide cohort study

AU - Poulsen, Aslak H.

AU - Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole

AU - Peña, Alfredo

AU - Hahmann, Andrea N.

AU - Nordsborg, Rikke Baastrup

AU - Ketzel, Matthias

AU - Brandt, Jørgen

AU - Sørensen, Mette

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

N2 - Noise from wind turbines (WTs) is reported as more annoying than traffic noise at similar levels, raising concerns as to whether WT noise (WTN) may negatively affect health, as reported for traffic noise. We aimed to investigate whether residential WTN is associated with adverse birth outcomes. Based on national registries, we identified all Danish dwellings situated within ≤ 20 wt heights radius and a random selection of 25% of dwellings situated within 20–40 wt heights radius of a WT. We identified 135,795 pregnant women living in the dwellings from 1982 to 2013, and collected information on gestational age and birth weight from a national birth registry. Using data on WT type and simulated hourly wind at each WT, we estimated hourly outdoor and low frequency (LF) indoor WTN at the dwellings of the pregnant women and aggregated as mean nighttime WTN during pregnancy. We used logistic regression with adjustment for individual and area-level covariates for the analyses. We did not find evidence suggesting that mean pregnancy or trimester-specific exposure to outdoor or indoor LF WTN were associated with any of the three adverse birth outcomes investigated: preterm birth (n = 13,003), term small for gestational age (n = 12,220) or term low birth weight (n = 1127). However, the number of cases in the highest exposure categories of ≥ 42 dB outdoor WTN or ≥ 15 dB indoor LF WTN were low for all outcomes (n between 0 and 31). The present study does not support an association between nighttime WTN and adverse birth outcomes. However, there were few cases in the high exposure groups and the results call for reproduction.

AB - Noise from wind turbines (WTs) is reported as more annoying than traffic noise at similar levels, raising concerns as to whether WT noise (WTN) may negatively affect health, as reported for traffic noise. We aimed to investigate whether residential WTN is associated with adverse birth outcomes. Based on national registries, we identified all Danish dwellings situated within ≤ 20 wt heights radius and a random selection of 25% of dwellings situated within 20–40 wt heights radius of a WT. We identified 135,795 pregnant women living in the dwellings from 1982 to 2013, and collected information on gestational age and birth weight from a national birth registry. Using data on WT type and simulated hourly wind at each WT, we estimated hourly outdoor and low frequency (LF) indoor WTN at the dwellings of the pregnant women and aggregated as mean nighttime WTN during pregnancy. We used logistic regression with adjustment for individual and area-level covariates for the analyses. We did not find evidence suggesting that mean pregnancy or trimester-specific exposure to outdoor or indoor LF WTN were associated with any of the three adverse birth outcomes investigated: preterm birth (n = 13,003), term small for gestational age (n = 12,220) or term low birth weight (n = 1127). However, the number of cases in the highest exposure categories of ≥ 42 dB outdoor WTN or ≥ 15 dB indoor LF WTN were low for all outcomes (n between 0 and 31). The present study does not support an association between nighttime WTN and adverse birth outcomes. However, there were few cases in the high exposure groups and the results call for reproduction.

U2 - 10.1016/j.envres.2018.09.011

DO - 10.1016/j.envres.2018.09.011

M3 - Journal article

VL - 167

SP - 770

EP - 775

JO - Environmental Research

JF - Environmental Research

SN - 0013-9351

ER -