Normative Power Europe:

A Contradiction in Terms?

Ian Manners

Publikation: Working paperForskning

Resumé

Hedley Bull’s searing 1982 critique of the European Community’s ‘civilian power’ in international affairs serves as the point of departure for my discussion of the European Union’s ‘normative power’ in contemporary international society. The idea of using Bull’s examination of civilian power Europe as an entry point to a discussion on the value of using English School terms to study the EU may strike many as a contradiction in terms. I will attempt to use this paper to argue that two apparent contradictions are useful in this respect - the concept of an ‘EU Society’, and the idea of the EU’s international role being primarily normative, not economic or military.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
Udgivelses stedCopenhagen
UdgiverCopenhagen Peace Research Institute
Antal sider61
StatusUdgivet - 2000
Udgivet eksterntJa

Citer dette

Manners, I. (2000). Normative Power Europe: A Contradiction in Terms? Copenhagen: Copenhagen Peace Research Institute.
Manners, Ian. / Normative Power Europe: A Contradiction in Terms?. Copenhagen : Copenhagen Peace Research Institute, 2000.
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Manners, I 2000 'Normative Power Europe: A Contradiction in Terms?' Copenhagen Peace Research Institute, Copenhagen.

Normative Power Europe: A Contradiction in Terms? / Manners, Ian.

Copenhagen : Copenhagen Peace Research Institute, 2000.

Publikation: Working paperForskning

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Manners I. Normative Power Europe: A Contradiction in Terms? Copenhagen: Copenhagen Peace Research Institute. 2000.