Lifelong Learning Experience and Level of Social Exclusion or Inclusion of Asian Communities Living in Denmark and the United Kingdom

Rashmi Singla, Sonia Klein, Jasbir Panesar

    Publikation: Bidrag til bog/antologi/rapportKonferencebidrag i proceedingsForskning

    Resumé

    This article reflects the situation of Asian communities in Denmark and the United Kingdom which is influenced by global trends, the patterns of differing learning they participate in which are influenced by the concept of LifeLong Learning within each country, educational opportunities, socio-economic positions of this target group and entrepreneurship activities taking place. Global trends influence disadvantaged learners level of participation in learning within Europe. The Asian communities in Denmark and the United Kingdom, despite the differences in migration period, have made the decision to live in these countries for many reasons, including economic reasons. However, the different history of migration and internal policies in each country has determined the level of this community’s participation in active citizenship and Lifelong Learning. For instance, in Denmark, the situation is as such that minorities, including Asian communities, have been negatively affected in the recent years due to the increased political restrictions and media coverage. In comparison, despite the recent immigration policies in the UK, many members of the Asian communities have embraced the opportunities LifeLong Learning has produced and have led to some social change. Through accessing educational guidance and educational opportunities, members of the Asian communities have gone on to improving their socio-economic status. This has occurred via education leading to better employment options and entrepreneurship. Entrepreneurship has been a foundation for immigrants to develop and establish a sense of citizenship. The impacts of life long learning in this digital age has important implications on the future of entrepreneurship as a viable option for immigrants. The landscape and accessibility of knowledge in the 21st century world is changing and producing a gradual domino effect on the socio-economic status of Asians in Europe.
    OriginalsprogEngelsk
    TitelThe Annual Conference of the Forum for the Advancement og Continuing Education : Towards a Global Understanding of Lifelong Learning: Making a Difference University College Cork, Ireland
    Antal sider5
    ForlagUniversity College Cork
    Publikationsdato2005
    Sider175- 180
    StatusUdgivet - 2005
    BegivenhedFACE Annual Conference 2005 - Cork, Irland
    Varighed: 6 jul. 20058 jul. 2005

    Konference

    KonferenceFACE Annual Conference 2005
    LandIrland
    ByCork
    Periode06/07/200508/07/2005

    Citer dette

    Singla, R., Klein, S., & Panesar, J. (2005). Lifelong Learning Experience and Level of Social Exclusion or Inclusion of Asian Communities Living in Denmark and the United Kingdom. I The Annual Conference of the Forum for the Advancement og Continuing Education: Towards a Global Understanding of Lifelong Learning: Making a Difference University College Cork, Ireland (s. 175- 180). University College Cork.
    Singla, Rashmi ; Klein, Sonia ; Panesar, Jasbir. / Lifelong Learning Experience and Level of Social Exclusion or Inclusion of Asian Communities Living in Denmark and the United Kingdom. The Annual Conference of the Forum for the Advancement og Continuing Education: Towards a Global Understanding of Lifelong Learning: Making a Difference University College Cork, Ireland. University College Cork, 2005. s. 175- 180
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    title = "Lifelong Learning Experience and Level of Social Exclusion or Inclusion of Asian Communities Living in Denmark and the United Kingdom",
    abstract = "This article reflects the situation of Asian communities in Denmark and the United Kingdom which is influenced by global trends, the patterns of differing learning they participate in which are influenced by the concept of LifeLong Learning within each country, educational opportunities, socio-economic positions of this target group and entrepreneurship activities taking place. Global trends influence disadvantaged learners level of participation in learning within Europe. The Asian communities in Denmark and the United Kingdom, despite the differences in migration period, have made the decision to live in these countries for many reasons, including economic reasons. However, the different history of migration and internal policies in each country has determined the level of this community’s participation in active citizenship and Lifelong Learning. For instance, in Denmark, the situation is as such that minorities, including Asian communities, have been negatively affected in the recent years due to the increased political restrictions and media coverage. In comparison, despite the recent immigration policies in the UK, many members of the Asian communities have embraced the opportunities LifeLong Learning has produced and have led to some social change. Through accessing educational guidance and educational opportunities, members of the Asian communities have gone on to improving their socio-economic status. This has occurred via education leading to better employment options and entrepreneurship. Entrepreneurship has been a foundation for immigrants to develop and establish a sense of citizenship. The impacts of life long learning in this digital age has important implications on the future of entrepreneurship as a viable option for immigrants. The landscape and accessibility of knowledge in the 21st century world is changing and producing a gradual domino effect on the socio-economic status of Asians in Europe.",
    keywords = "ethnic minority , marginalisation, Transcultural Therapeutic Team, psychosocial Intervention & workshops, parental empowerment, socio-economic exclusion in Britain, electronic empowerement of enterpreners",
    author = "Rashmi Singla and Sonia Klein and Jasbir Panesar",
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    Singla, R, Klein, S & Panesar, J 2005, Lifelong Learning Experience and Level of Social Exclusion or Inclusion of Asian Communities Living in Denmark and the United Kingdom. i The Annual Conference of the Forum for the Advancement og Continuing Education: Towards a Global Understanding of Lifelong Learning: Making a Difference University College Cork, Ireland. University College Cork, s. 175- 180, FACE Annual Conference 2005, Cork, Irland, 06/07/2005.

    Lifelong Learning Experience and Level of Social Exclusion or Inclusion of Asian Communities Living in Denmark and the United Kingdom. / Singla, Rashmi; Klein, Sonia; Panesar, Jasbir.

    The Annual Conference of the Forum for the Advancement og Continuing Education: Towards a Global Understanding of Lifelong Learning: Making a Difference University College Cork, Ireland. University College Cork, 2005. s. 175- 180.

    Publikation: Bidrag til bog/antologi/rapportKonferencebidrag i proceedingsForskning

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    AB - This article reflects the situation of Asian communities in Denmark and the United Kingdom which is influenced by global trends, the patterns of differing learning they participate in which are influenced by the concept of LifeLong Learning within each country, educational opportunities, socio-economic positions of this target group and entrepreneurship activities taking place. Global trends influence disadvantaged learners level of participation in learning within Europe. The Asian communities in Denmark and the United Kingdom, despite the differences in migration period, have made the decision to live in these countries for many reasons, including economic reasons. However, the different history of migration and internal policies in each country has determined the level of this community’s participation in active citizenship and Lifelong Learning. For instance, in Denmark, the situation is as such that minorities, including Asian communities, have been negatively affected in the recent years due to the increased political restrictions and media coverage. In comparison, despite the recent immigration policies in the UK, many members of the Asian communities have embraced the opportunities LifeLong Learning has produced and have led to some social change. Through accessing educational guidance and educational opportunities, members of the Asian communities have gone on to improving their socio-economic status. This has occurred via education leading to better employment options and entrepreneurship. Entrepreneurship has been a foundation for immigrants to develop and establish a sense of citizenship. The impacts of life long learning in this digital age has important implications on the future of entrepreneurship as a viable option for immigrants. The landscape and accessibility of knowledge in the 21st century world is changing and producing a gradual domino effect on the socio-economic status of Asians in Europe.

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    Singla R, Klein S, Panesar J. Lifelong Learning Experience and Level of Social Exclusion or Inclusion of Asian Communities Living in Denmark and the United Kingdom. I The Annual Conference of the Forum for the Advancement og Continuing Education: Towards a Global Understanding of Lifelong Learning: Making a Difference University College Cork, Ireland. University College Cork. 2005. s. 175- 180