Issue Framing and Sector Character as Critical Parameters for Government Contracting-Out in the UK

Erik Bækkeskov

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

This article shows that variations in how two UK governments justified contracting-out (issue framing), combined with shifting sector-derived incentives for union activism (sector character), can help explain the extent of contracting-out. Janitorial service, an activity of the UK government that should have been ‘low hanging fruit' for its prolific reformers, proved difficult to contract-out for Thatcher's New Right Conservatives, but easier to contract-out for Blair's New Labour. The New Right government framed contracting-out narrowly, as merely an improvement in operational efficiency, and its reform faced unions that stood to lose a great deal from movement of janitorial jobs to private firms. In contrast, the New Labour government framed contracting-out broadly, as a means to efficient social justice, and faced unions with low stakes in government janitors. As a consequence, UK government units could expect lower benefit and higher cost from contracting-out janitors under Thatcher than they would under Blair.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftPublic Administration
Vol/bind89
Udgave nummer4
Sider (fra-til)1489-1508
ISSN0033-3298
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2011

Citer dette

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Issue Framing and Sector Character as Critical Parameters for Government Contracting-Out in the UK. / Bækkeskov, Erik.

I: Public Administration, Bind 89, Nr. 4, 2011, s. 1489-1508.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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