Is it easier to believe than to disbelieve?

An examination of consumers’ reactions to unsubstantiated marketing claims about ecological products

Jan Mattsson, Magnus Söderlund

Publikation: KonferencebidragKonferenceabstrakt til konferenceForskningpeer review

Resumé

Marketers often claim that products are “green”, “organic”, and “ecological” without backing this up with official, certifying labels or by other evidence. The effects of this practice were examined in the present study for ingestible products (water and beer) and non-ingestible products (bicycle tires and boots) with a set of between-subjects experiments. The presence versus the absence of an (unsubstantiated) ecological claim was the manipulated factor. The purpose was to examine the impact of ecological claims on beliefs that a product is indeed ecological, on beliefs about related product attributes (environmental friendliness, healthiness, and naturalness), and on overall product evaluations in terms of the attitude towards the product. A main finding, in each experiment, was that the participants believed to a greater extent that a product is ecological when this is claimed, thus showing that such beliefs can be influenced easily. However, an ecological claim had a limited impact on beliefs about other product attributes and on overall product attitudes, indicating that there are limits to the influence of such claims.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
Publikationsdato2019
StatusAfsendt - 2019
BegivenhedNordic Academy of Management - Vaasa, Finland
Varighed: 22 aug. 201924 aug. 2019

Konference

KonferenceNordic Academy of Management
LokationVaasa
LandFinland
Periode22/08/201924/08/2019

Citer dette

@conference{6635d6b4ba224e939b3571d2c2de71e4,
title = "Is it easier to believe than to disbelieve?: An examination of consumers’ reactions to unsubstantiated marketing claims about ecological products",
abstract = "Marketers often claim that products are “green”, “organic”, and “ecological” without backing this up with official, certifying labels or by other evidence. The effects of this practice were examined in the present study for ingestible products (water and beer) and non-ingestible products (bicycle tires and boots) with a set of between-subjects experiments. The presence versus the absence of an (unsubstantiated) ecological claim was the manipulated factor. The purpose was to examine the impact of ecological claims on beliefs that a product is indeed ecological, on beliefs about related product attributes (environmental friendliness, healthiness, and naturalness), and on overall product evaluations in terms of the attitude towards the product. A main finding, in each experiment, was that the participants believed to a greater extent that a product is ecological when this is claimed, thus showing that such beliefs can be influenced easily. However, an ecological claim had a limited impact on beliefs about other product attributes and on overall product attitudes, indicating that there are limits to the influence of such claims.",
author = "Jan Mattsson and Magnus S{\"o}derlund",
year = "2019",
language = "English",
note = "Nordic Academy of Management ; Conference date: 22-08-2019 Through 24-08-2019",

}

Is it easier to believe than to disbelieve? An examination of consumers’ reactions to unsubstantiated marketing claims about ecological products . / Mattsson, Jan; Söderlund, Magnus.

2019. Abstract fra Nordic Academy of Management, Finland.

Publikation: KonferencebidragKonferenceabstrakt til konferenceForskningpeer review

TY - ABST

T1 - Is it easier to believe than to disbelieve?

T2 - An examination of consumers’ reactions to unsubstantiated marketing claims about ecological products

AU - Mattsson, Jan

AU - Söderlund, Magnus

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - Marketers often claim that products are “green”, “organic”, and “ecological” without backing this up with official, certifying labels or by other evidence. The effects of this practice were examined in the present study for ingestible products (water and beer) and non-ingestible products (bicycle tires and boots) with a set of between-subjects experiments. The presence versus the absence of an (unsubstantiated) ecological claim was the manipulated factor. The purpose was to examine the impact of ecological claims on beliefs that a product is indeed ecological, on beliefs about related product attributes (environmental friendliness, healthiness, and naturalness), and on overall product evaluations in terms of the attitude towards the product. A main finding, in each experiment, was that the participants believed to a greater extent that a product is ecological when this is claimed, thus showing that such beliefs can be influenced easily. However, an ecological claim had a limited impact on beliefs about other product attributes and on overall product attitudes, indicating that there are limits to the influence of such claims.

AB - Marketers often claim that products are “green”, “organic”, and “ecological” without backing this up with official, certifying labels or by other evidence. The effects of this practice were examined in the present study for ingestible products (water and beer) and non-ingestible products (bicycle tires and boots) with a set of between-subjects experiments. The presence versus the absence of an (unsubstantiated) ecological claim was the manipulated factor. The purpose was to examine the impact of ecological claims on beliefs that a product is indeed ecological, on beliefs about related product attributes (environmental friendliness, healthiness, and naturalness), and on overall product evaluations in terms of the attitude towards the product. A main finding, in each experiment, was that the participants believed to a greater extent that a product is ecological when this is claimed, thus showing that such beliefs can be influenced easily. However, an ecological claim had a limited impact on beliefs about other product attributes and on overall product attitudes, indicating that there are limits to the influence of such claims.

M3 - Conference abstract for conference

ER -