Illustrating Chaucer in Denmark 1943-58: Artistry and visual interpretation

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

In this chapter five Danish Chaucer publications from the period 1943-1958 are treated, with a special emphasis on the illustrations
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftLiterature Compass
Vol/bind15
Udgave nummer6
Antal sider13
ISSN1741-4113
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2018

Bibliografisk note

Published in international peer reviewed special issue af Literature Compass, eds. Candace Barrington and Jonathan Psy Title: Chaucer’s Global Compaignye

Emneord

  • Chaucer
  • oversættelse
  • engelsk i Danmark

Citer dette

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title = "Illustrating Chaucer in Denmark 1943-58: Artistry and visual interpretation",
abstract = "In this chapter, five Danish Chaucer publications from the period 1943–1958 are treated, with a special emphasis on the illustrations. First, it is noted that the most significant Danish translation of Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, B{\o}rge Johansen's Geoffrey Chaucer: Canterburyfort{\ae}llingerne I–II from 1958, does not contain illustrations, which is well in line with the fact that both the translation and the preface place Chaucer in a somewhat highbrow literary context. In contrast, the other four translations are richly illustrated, often foregrounding erotic elements in the tales. This is particularly true of Ludmilla Balfour's illustrations accompanying Boisen's prose translation of The Canterbury Tales from 1952 and Erik Christensen's woodcuts in a de luxe edition of three tales, translated by J{\o}rgen Sonne in 1949/1950. I show how the illustrations generally support the interpretation of the tales and even at points enter into a dialog with the content. Thus, my analysis shows how Ib Spang Olsen in 1946 underlines the death motif in his illustrations of Thorbj{\o}rnsen's De tre drikkebr{\o}dre (), her translation of Chaucer's Pardoner's Tale. Also Poul Christensen, with his simple depiction of The Wife of Bath's life with five husbands, well supports Flemming Bergs{\o}e's elegant poetic translation of Chaucer's probably best known tale.",
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year = "2018",
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Illustrating Chaucer in Denmark 1943-58 : Artistry and visual interpretation. / Klitgård, Ebbe.

I: Literature Compass, Bind 15, Nr. 6, 2018.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Illustrating Chaucer in Denmark 1943-58

T2 - Artistry and visual interpretation

AU - Klitgård, Ebbe

N1 - Published in international peer reviewed special issue af Literature Compass, eds. Candace Barrington and Jonathan Psy Title: Chaucer’s Global Compaignye

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

N2 - In this chapter, five Danish Chaucer publications from the period 1943–1958 are treated, with a special emphasis on the illustrations. First, it is noted that the most significant Danish translation of Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, Børge Johansen's Geoffrey Chaucer: Canterburyfortællingerne I–II from 1958, does not contain illustrations, which is well in line with the fact that both the translation and the preface place Chaucer in a somewhat highbrow literary context. In contrast, the other four translations are richly illustrated, often foregrounding erotic elements in the tales. This is particularly true of Ludmilla Balfour's illustrations accompanying Boisen's prose translation of The Canterbury Tales from 1952 and Erik Christensen's woodcuts in a de luxe edition of three tales, translated by Jørgen Sonne in 1949/1950. I show how the illustrations generally support the interpretation of the tales and even at points enter into a dialog with the content. Thus, my analysis shows how Ib Spang Olsen in 1946 underlines the death motif in his illustrations of Thorbjørnsen's De tre drikkebrødre (), her translation of Chaucer's Pardoner's Tale. Also Poul Christensen, with his simple depiction of The Wife of Bath's life with five husbands, well supports Flemming Bergsøe's elegant poetic translation of Chaucer's probably best known tale.

AB - In this chapter, five Danish Chaucer publications from the period 1943–1958 are treated, with a special emphasis on the illustrations. First, it is noted that the most significant Danish translation of Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, Børge Johansen's Geoffrey Chaucer: Canterburyfortællingerne I–II from 1958, does not contain illustrations, which is well in line with the fact that both the translation and the preface place Chaucer in a somewhat highbrow literary context. In contrast, the other four translations are richly illustrated, often foregrounding erotic elements in the tales. This is particularly true of Ludmilla Balfour's illustrations accompanying Boisen's prose translation of The Canterbury Tales from 1952 and Erik Christensen's woodcuts in a de luxe edition of three tales, translated by Jørgen Sonne in 1949/1950. I show how the illustrations generally support the interpretation of the tales and even at points enter into a dialog with the content. Thus, my analysis shows how Ib Spang Olsen in 1946 underlines the death motif in his illustrations of Thorbjørnsen's De tre drikkebrødre (), her translation of Chaucer's Pardoner's Tale. Also Poul Christensen, with his simple depiction of The Wife of Bath's life with five husbands, well supports Flemming Bergsøe's elegant poetic translation of Chaucer's probably best known tale.

KW - Chaucer

KW - oversættelse

KW - engelsk i Danmark

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M3 - Journal article

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JO - Literature Compass

JF - Literature Compass

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