How Does Research Performativity Impact on the Non-Core Regions of Europe? The Case for a New Research Agenda

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

Higher education systems are caught between two dynamic processes, one referring to economic value and the other to status value. Although these political rationalities are presented as part of a coherent programme of reform and ‘modernisation’, they pull higher education systems and the actors within them in contradictory directions. Their impact can collectively be referred to as research selectivity since these rationalities encompass both what is often regarded as research performativity as well as institutional practices of recognition and reward and subjective strategies. This paper has a double aim: First, to map the dominant orientations of higher education studies research and how this has interrogated the relationship between neoliberalism and the restructuring of higher education systems and research infrastructure. Our reading shows that this is a significant context for inquiring into research selectivity as it is enacted and, at the same time, suggests that we need to pay attention to the privileging of existing centres of higher education research and the relative absence of sustained focus on research selectivity in the non-core regions of Europe. The second aim, then, is to put forward the case for a sustained research agenda that focuses specifically on the identification of the differential impact of processes of research selectivity in non¬-core regions of Europe, organised around three intersecting themes – linguistic impact, epistemological impact, and disciplinary impact. Arguing for the importance and relevance of this research agenda for empirical research in Europe and globally, the paper emphasises that its main objective is to create a critical space within which we can, collectively, think higher education otherwise.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftHigher Education
ISSN0018-1560
StatusAfsendt - 4 jul. 2019

Citer dette

@article{98ca860169a141c39112591290cf86a8,
title = "How Does Research Performativity Impact on the Non-Core Regions of Europe? The Case for a New Research Agenda",
abstract = "Higher education systems are caught between two dynamic processes, one referring to economic value and the other to status value. Although these political rationalities are presented as part of a coherent programme of reform and ‘modernisation’, they pull higher education systems and the actors within them in contradictory directions. Their impact can collectively be referred to as research selectivity since these rationalities encompass both what is often regarded as research performativity as well as institutional practices of recognition and reward and subjective strategies. This paper has a double aim: First, to map the dominant orientations of higher education studies research and how this has interrogated the relationship between neoliberalism and the restructuring of higher education systems and research infrastructure. Our reading shows that this is a significant context for inquiring into research selectivity as it is enacted and, at the same time, suggests that we need to pay attention to the privileging of existing centres of higher education research and the relative absence of sustained focus on research selectivity in the non-core regions of Europe. The second aim, then, is to put forward the case for a sustained research agenda that focuses specifically on the identification of the differential impact of processes of research selectivity in non¬-core regions of Europe, organised around three intersecting themes – linguistic impact, epistemological impact, and disciplinary impact. Arguing for the importance and relevance of this research agenda for empirical research in Europe and globally, the paper emphasises that its main objective is to create a critical space within which we can, collectively, think higher education otherwise.",
author = "Simon Warren",
year = "2019",
month = "7",
day = "4",
language = "English",
journal = "Higher Education",
issn = "0018-1560",
publisher = "Springer Netherlands",

}

How Does Research Performativity Impact on the Non-Core Regions of Europe? The Case for a New Research Agenda. / Warren, Simon.

I: Higher Education, 04.07.2019.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - How Does Research Performativity Impact on the Non-Core Regions of Europe? The Case for a New Research Agenda

AU - Warren, Simon

PY - 2019/7/4

Y1 - 2019/7/4

N2 - Higher education systems are caught between two dynamic processes, one referring to economic value and the other to status value. Although these political rationalities are presented as part of a coherent programme of reform and ‘modernisation’, they pull higher education systems and the actors within them in contradictory directions. Their impact can collectively be referred to as research selectivity since these rationalities encompass both what is often regarded as research performativity as well as institutional practices of recognition and reward and subjective strategies. This paper has a double aim: First, to map the dominant orientations of higher education studies research and how this has interrogated the relationship between neoliberalism and the restructuring of higher education systems and research infrastructure. Our reading shows that this is a significant context for inquiring into research selectivity as it is enacted and, at the same time, suggests that we need to pay attention to the privileging of existing centres of higher education research and the relative absence of sustained focus on research selectivity in the non-core regions of Europe. The second aim, then, is to put forward the case for a sustained research agenda that focuses specifically on the identification of the differential impact of processes of research selectivity in non¬-core regions of Europe, organised around three intersecting themes – linguistic impact, epistemological impact, and disciplinary impact. Arguing for the importance and relevance of this research agenda for empirical research in Europe and globally, the paper emphasises that its main objective is to create a critical space within which we can, collectively, think higher education otherwise.

AB - Higher education systems are caught between two dynamic processes, one referring to economic value and the other to status value. Although these political rationalities are presented as part of a coherent programme of reform and ‘modernisation’, they pull higher education systems and the actors within them in contradictory directions. Their impact can collectively be referred to as research selectivity since these rationalities encompass both what is often regarded as research performativity as well as institutional practices of recognition and reward and subjective strategies. This paper has a double aim: First, to map the dominant orientations of higher education studies research and how this has interrogated the relationship between neoliberalism and the restructuring of higher education systems and research infrastructure. Our reading shows that this is a significant context for inquiring into research selectivity as it is enacted and, at the same time, suggests that we need to pay attention to the privileging of existing centres of higher education research and the relative absence of sustained focus on research selectivity in the non-core regions of Europe. The second aim, then, is to put forward the case for a sustained research agenda that focuses specifically on the identification of the differential impact of processes of research selectivity in non¬-core regions of Europe, organised around three intersecting themes – linguistic impact, epistemological impact, and disciplinary impact. Arguing for the importance and relevance of this research agenda for empirical research in Europe and globally, the paper emphasises that its main objective is to create a critical space within which we can, collectively, think higher education otherwise.

M3 - Journal article

JO - Higher Education

JF - Higher Education

SN - 0018-1560

ER -