Gendered Connections

Steffen Bo Jensen

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

    Abstract

    This article explores the gendered nature of urban politics in Cape Town by focusing on a group of female, township politicians. Employing the Deleuzian concept of `wild connectivity', it argues that these politically entrepreneurial women were able to negotiate a highly volatile urban landscape by drawing on and operationalizing violent, male networks — from struggle activists' networks, to vigilante groups and gangs, to the police. The fact that they were women helped them to tap into and exploit these networks. At the same time, they were restricted by their sex, as their ability to navigate space also drew on quite traditional notions of female respectability. Furthermore, the article argues, the form of wild connectivity to an extent was a function of the political transition, which destabilized formal structures of gendered authority. It remains a question whether this form of connectivity might endure, as Capetonian politics assumes a post-apartheid structure.
    OriginalsprogEngelsk
    TidsskriftCritique of Anthropology
    Vol/bind29
    Udgave nummer1
    Sider (fra-til)47-64
    ISSN0308-275X
    DOI
    StatusUdgivet - 2009

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