Disturbing Femininity

Bidragets oversatte titel: Forstyrrende kvindelighed

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

When Helle Thorning-Schmidt in 2011 became the first female Prime Minister in Denmark, this “victory for the women” was praised in highly celebratory tones in Danish newspapers. The celebration involved a paradoxical representation of gen-der as simultaneously irrelevant to politics and – when it comes to femininity – in need of management. Based on an analysis of the newspaper coverage of the elec-tion, I argue that highlighting gender (in)equality as either an important political issue or as something that conditions the possibilities of taking up a position as politician was evaluated as a performative speech act, i.e. an act that creates the trouble it names. Ruling out gender equality as relevant was, however, continually interrupted by comments on how Thorning-Schmidt and other female politicians perform gender in ways that fit or do not fit with “doing politician”. These com-ments tended to concern the styling of bodies and behaviour and followed well known – or sticky – gendered scripts.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
Artikelnummer12
TidsskriftCulture Unbound: Journal of Current Cultural Research
Vol/bind5
Udgave nummer12
Sider (fra-til)153-173
Antal sider21
ISSN2000-1525
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2013

Emneord

  • gender equality
  • Gender
  • politics
  • performativity
  • performance
  • celebrity
  • Danish newspapers

Citer dette

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title = "Disturbing Femininity",
abstract = "When Helle Thorning-Schmidt in 2011 became the first female Prime Minister in Denmark, this “victory for the women” was praised in highly celebratory tones in Danish newspapers. The celebration involved a paradoxical representation of gen-der as simultaneously irrelevant to politics and – when it comes to femininity – in need of management. Based on an analysis of the newspaper coverage of the elec-tion, I argue that highlighting gender (in)equality as either an important political issue or as something that conditions the possibilities of taking up a position as politician was evaluated as a performative speech act, i.e. an act that creates the trouble it names. Ruling out gender equality as relevant was, however, continually interrupted by comments on how Thorning-Schmidt and other female politicians perform gender in ways that fit or do not fit with “doing politician”. These com-ments tended to concern the styling of bodies and behaviour and followed well known – or sticky – gendered scripts.",
keywords = "gender equality , Gender , politics , performativity , performance , celebrity , Danish newspapers, gender equality , Gender, politics , performativity , performance, celebrity, Danish newspapers",
author = "Kirsten Hveneg{\aa}rd-Lassen",
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Disturbing Femininity. / Hvenegård-Lassen, Kirsten.

I: Culture Unbound: Journal of Current Cultural Research, Bind 5, Nr. 12, 12, 2013, s. 153-173.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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KW - celebrity

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KW - politics

KW - performativity

KW - performance

KW - celebrity

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