Five challenges in modelling interacting strain dynamics

Paul S Wikramaratna, Adam Kurcharski, Sunetra Gupta, Viggo Andreasen, Angela R McLean, Julia R Gog

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

Population epidemiological models where hosts can be infected sequentially by different strains have the potential to help us understand many important diseases. Researchers have in recent years started to develop and use such models, but the extra layer of complexity from multiple strains brings with it many technical challenges. It is therefore hard to build models which have realistic assumptions yet are tractable. Here we outline some of the main challenges in this area. First we begin with the fundamental question of how to translate from complex small-scale dynamics within a host to useful population models. Next we consider the nature of so-called “strain space”. We describe two key types of host heterogeneities, and explain how models could help generate a better understanding of their effects. Finally, for diseases with many strains, we consider the challenge of modelling how immunity accumulates over multiple exposures
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftEpidemics
Vol/bind10
Sider (fra-til)31-34
Antal sider4
ISSN1755-4365
DOI
StatusUdgivet - mar. 2015

Citer dette

Wikramaratna, P. S., Kurcharski, A., Gupta, S., Andreasen, V., McLean, A. R., & Gog, J. R. (2015). Five challenges in modelling interacting strain dynamics. Epidemics, 10, 31-34. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.epidem.2014.07.005
Wikramaratna, Paul S ; Kurcharski, Adam ; Gupta, Sunetra ; Andreasen, Viggo ; McLean, Angela R ; Gog, Julia R. / Five challenges in modelling interacting strain dynamics. I: Epidemics. 2015 ; Bind 10. s. 31-34.
@article{ac840767730c49199810cec861468200,
title = "Five challenges in modelling interacting strain dynamics",
abstract = "Population epidemiological models where hosts can be infected sequentially by different strains have the potential to help us understand many important diseases. Researchers have in recent years started to develop and use such models, but the extra layer of complexity from multiple strains brings with it many technical challenges. It is therefore hard to build models which have realistic assumptions yet are tractable. Here we outline some of the main challenges in this area. First we begin with the fundamental question of how to translate from complex small-scale dynamics within a host to useful population models. Next we consider the nature of so-called “strain space”. We describe two key types of host heterogeneities, and explain how models could help generate a better understanding of their effects. Finally, for diseases with many strains, we consider the challenge of modelling how immunity accumulates over multiple exposures",
author = "Wikramaratna, {Paul S} and Adam Kurcharski and Sunetra Gupta and Viggo Andreasen and McLean, {Angela R} and Gog, {Julia R}",
year = "2015",
month = "3",
doi = "10.1016/j.epidem.2014.07.005",
language = "English",
volume = "10",
pages = "31--34",
journal = "Epidemics",
issn = "1755-4365",
publisher = "Elsevier BV",

}

Wikramaratna, PS, Kurcharski, A, Gupta, S, Andreasen, V, McLean, AR & Gog, JR 2015, 'Five challenges in modelling interacting strain dynamics', Epidemics, bind 10, s. 31-34. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.epidem.2014.07.005

Five challenges in modelling interacting strain dynamics. / Wikramaratna, Paul S; Kurcharski, Adam; Gupta, Sunetra; Andreasen, Viggo; McLean, Angela R; Gog, Julia R.

I: Epidemics, Bind 10, 03.2015, s. 31-34.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Five challenges in modelling interacting strain dynamics

AU - Wikramaratna, Paul S

AU - Kurcharski, Adam

AU - Gupta, Sunetra

AU - Andreasen, Viggo

AU - McLean, Angela R

AU - Gog, Julia R

PY - 2015/3

Y1 - 2015/3

N2 - Population epidemiological models where hosts can be infected sequentially by different strains have the potential to help us understand many important diseases. Researchers have in recent years started to develop and use such models, but the extra layer of complexity from multiple strains brings with it many technical challenges. It is therefore hard to build models which have realistic assumptions yet are tractable. Here we outline some of the main challenges in this area. First we begin with the fundamental question of how to translate from complex small-scale dynamics within a host to useful population models. Next we consider the nature of so-called “strain space”. We describe two key types of host heterogeneities, and explain how models could help generate a better understanding of their effects. Finally, for diseases with many strains, we consider the challenge of modelling how immunity accumulates over multiple exposures

AB - Population epidemiological models where hosts can be infected sequentially by different strains have the potential to help us understand many important diseases. Researchers have in recent years started to develop and use such models, but the extra layer of complexity from multiple strains brings with it many technical challenges. It is therefore hard to build models which have realistic assumptions yet are tractable. Here we outline some of the main challenges in this area. First we begin with the fundamental question of how to translate from complex small-scale dynamics within a host to useful population models. Next we consider the nature of so-called “strain space”. We describe two key types of host heterogeneities, and explain how models could help generate a better understanding of their effects. Finally, for diseases with many strains, we consider the challenge of modelling how immunity accumulates over multiple exposures

U2 - 10.1016/j.epidem.2014.07.005

DO - 10.1016/j.epidem.2014.07.005

M3 - Journal article

VL - 10

SP - 31

EP - 34

JO - Epidemics

JF - Epidemics

SN - 1755-4365

ER -

Wikramaratna PS, Kurcharski A, Gupta S, Andreasen V, McLean AR, Gog JR. Five challenges in modelling interacting strain dynamics. Epidemics. 2015 mar;10:31-34. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.epidem.2014.07.005