Epidemiological Evidence of an Early Wave of the 1918 Influenza Pandemic in New York City

Donald R. Olson, Lone Simonsen, Paul J. Edelson, Stephen S. Morse

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

The 1918 "Spanish flu" was the fastest spreading and most deadly influenza pandemic in recorded history. Hypotheses of its origin have been based on a limited collection of case and outbreak reports from before its recognized European emergence in the summer of 1918. These anecdotal accounts, however, remain insufficient for determining the early diffusion and impact of the pandemic virus. Using routinely collected monthly age-stratified mortality data, we show that an unmistakable shift in the age distribution of epidemic deaths occurred during the 1917/1918 influenza season in New York City. The timing, magnitude, and age distribution of this mortality shift provide strong evidence that an early wave of the pandemic virus was present in New York City during February-April 1918.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Vol/bind102
Udgave nummer31
Antal sider5
ISSN0027-8424
StatusUdgivet - 2005
Udgivet eksterntJa

Citer dette

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Epidemiological Evidence of an Early Wave of the 1918 Influenza Pandemic in New York City. / Olson, Donald R.; Simonsen, Lone; Edelson, Paul J.; Morse, Stephen S.

I: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Bind 102, Nr. 31, 2005.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Epidemiological Evidence of an Early Wave of the 1918 Influenza Pandemic in New York City

AU - Olson, Donald R.

AU - Simonsen, Lone

AU - Edelson, Paul J.

AU - Morse, Stephen S.

PY - 2005

Y1 - 2005

N2 - The 1918 "Spanish flu" was the fastest spreading and most deadly influenza pandemic in recorded history. Hypotheses of its origin have been based on a limited collection of case and outbreak reports from before its recognized European emergence in the summer of 1918. These anecdotal accounts, however, remain insufficient for determining the early diffusion and impact of the pandemic virus. Using routinely collected monthly age-stratified mortality data, we show that an unmistakable shift in the age distribution of epidemic deaths occurred during the 1917/1918 influenza season in New York City. The timing, magnitude, and age distribution of this mortality shift provide strong evidence that an early wave of the pandemic virus was present in New York City during February-April 1918.

AB - The 1918 "Spanish flu" was the fastest spreading and most deadly influenza pandemic in recorded history. Hypotheses of its origin have been based on a limited collection of case and outbreak reports from before its recognized European emergence in the summer of 1918. These anecdotal accounts, however, remain insufficient for determining the early diffusion and impact of the pandemic virus. Using routinely collected monthly age-stratified mortality data, we show that an unmistakable shift in the age distribution of epidemic deaths occurred during the 1917/1918 influenza season in New York City. The timing, magnitude, and age distribution of this mortality shift provide strong evidence that an early wave of the pandemic virus was present in New York City during February-April 1918.

M3 - Journal article

VL - 102

JO - Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America

JF - Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America

SN - 0027-8424

IS - 31

ER -