Environmentally sensitive life-cycle traits have low elasticity

implications for theory and practice

Valery E. Forbes, Mette Olsen, Annemette Palmqvist, Peter Calow

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

The relationships between population growth rate and the life-cycle traits
contributing to it are nonlinear and variable. This has made it difficult for ecologists to consistently predict changes in population dynamics from observations on changes in life-cycle traits. We show that traits having a high sensitivity to chemical toxicants tend to have a low elasticity, meaning that changes in them have a relatively low impact on population growth rate, compared to other life-cycle traits. This makes evolutionary sense in that there should be selection against variability in population growth rate. In particular, we found that fecundity was generally more sensitive to chemical stress than was juvenile or adult survival or time to first reproduction, whereas fecundity typically had a lower elasticity than the other life-cycle traits. Similar relationships have been recorded in field populations for a wide range of taxa, but the conclusions were necessarily more tentative because stochastic effects and confounding
variables could not be excluded. Better knowledge of these relationships can be used to optimize population management and protection strategies and to increase understanding of the drivers of population dynamics.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftEcological Applications
Vol/bind20
Udgave nummer5
Sider (fra-til)1449-1455
Antal sider7
ISSN1051-0761
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2010

Citer dette

@article{d79ff0b2d848486691d1a068a3b195aa,
title = "Environmentally sensitive life-cycle traits have low elasticity: implications for theory and practice",
abstract = "The relationships between population growth rate and the life-cycle traits contributing to it are nonlinear and variable. This has made it difficult for ecologists to consistently predict changes in population dynamics from observations on changes in life-cycle traits. We show that traits having a high sensitivity to chemical toxicants tend to have a low elasticity, meaning that changes in them have a relatively low impact on population growth rate, compared to other life-cycle traits. This makes evolutionary sense in that there should be selection against variability in population growth rate. In particular, we found that fecundity was generally more sensitive to chemical stress than was juvenile or adult survival or time to first reproduction, whereas fecundity typically had a lower elasticity than the other life-cycle traits. Similar relationships have been recorded in field populations for a wide range of taxa, but the conclusions were necessarily more tentative because stochastic effects and confounding variables could not be excluded. Better knowledge of these relationships can be used to optimize population management and protection strategies and to increase understanding of the drivers of population dynamics.",
keywords = "ecotoxicology, population modeling, risk assessment",
author = "Forbes, {Valery E.} and Mette Olsen and Annemette Palmqvist and Peter Calow",
year = "2010",
doi = "10.1890/09-1063.1",
language = "English",
volume = "20",
pages = "1449--1455",
journal = "Ecological Applications",
issn = "1051-0761",
publisher = "JohnWiley & Sons, Inc.",
number = "5",

}

Environmentally sensitive life-cycle traits have low elasticity : implications for theory and practice. / Forbes, Valery E.; Olsen, Mette ; Palmqvist, Annemette; Calow, Peter.

I: Ecological Applications, Bind 20, Nr. 5, 2010, s. 1449-1455.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Environmentally sensitive life-cycle traits have low elasticity

T2 - implications for theory and practice

AU - Forbes, Valery E.

AU - Olsen, Mette

AU - Palmqvist, Annemette

AU - Calow, Peter

PY - 2010

Y1 - 2010

N2 - The relationships between population growth rate and the life-cycle traits contributing to it are nonlinear and variable. This has made it difficult for ecologists to consistently predict changes in population dynamics from observations on changes in life-cycle traits. We show that traits having a high sensitivity to chemical toxicants tend to have a low elasticity, meaning that changes in them have a relatively low impact on population growth rate, compared to other life-cycle traits. This makes evolutionary sense in that there should be selection against variability in population growth rate. In particular, we found that fecundity was generally more sensitive to chemical stress than was juvenile or adult survival or time to first reproduction, whereas fecundity typically had a lower elasticity than the other life-cycle traits. Similar relationships have been recorded in field populations for a wide range of taxa, but the conclusions were necessarily more tentative because stochastic effects and confounding variables could not be excluded. Better knowledge of these relationships can be used to optimize population management and protection strategies and to increase understanding of the drivers of population dynamics.

AB - The relationships between population growth rate and the life-cycle traits contributing to it are nonlinear and variable. This has made it difficult for ecologists to consistently predict changes in population dynamics from observations on changes in life-cycle traits. We show that traits having a high sensitivity to chemical toxicants tend to have a low elasticity, meaning that changes in them have a relatively low impact on population growth rate, compared to other life-cycle traits. This makes evolutionary sense in that there should be selection against variability in population growth rate. In particular, we found that fecundity was generally more sensitive to chemical stress than was juvenile or adult survival or time to first reproduction, whereas fecundity typically had a lower elasticity than the other life-cycle traits. Similar relationships have been recorded in field populations for a wide range of taxa, but the conclusions were necessarily more tentative because stochastic effects and confounding variables could not be excluded. Better knowledge of these relationships can be used to optimize population management and protection strategies and to increase understanding of the drivers of population dynamics.

KW - ecotoxicology

KW - population modeling

KW - risk assessment

U2 - 10.1890/09-1063.1

DO - 10.1890/09-1063.1

M3 - Journal article

VL - 20

SP - 1449

EP - 1455

JO - Ecological Applications

JF - Ecological Applications

SN - 1051-0761

IS - 5

ER -