Enterprise culture and the ethics of entitlement

How ‘indispensable’ employees turn into disruptive mavericks

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

This paper contributes to the debate about the enterprise culture by analysing the work ethic among talented employees who are seen as indispensable by their organisations. It describes the drama surrounding the ‘high talent’ IT-consultant Clark, a real individual used as emblematic here, and his quest for power and influence at work. The analysis adds nuance to the claims of both proponents and critics of the enterprise culture by showing how it leads neither to win-win scenarios nor to culturally duped employees. Instead, the enterprise ethic, with its focus on talent and excellence, has produced a group of elite workers who are driven by a sense of entitlement. This leads them to display maverick and disruptive behaviour that endangers the social cohesion of their organisations. But they are still driven by a deep sense of dedication and thus cannot be considered simply self-serving.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftEuropean Journal of Cultural and Political Sociology
Vol/bind6
Udgave nummer2
Sider (fra-til)143-171
ISSN2325-4823
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2019

Emneord

  • Employee identity
  • entrepreneurship
  • inequality
  • Talent
  • Elite
  • Excellence

Citer dette

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Enterprise culture and the ethics of entitlement : How ‘indispensable’ employees turn into disruptive mavericks. / Ekman, Susanne.

I: European Journal of Cultural and Political Sociology , Bind 6, Nr. 2, 2019, s. 143-171.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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