Englisch als ›Welt‹-Sprache im Hightech-Kapitalismus

Bidragets oversatte titel: Engelsk som ›verdens‹sprog i hightech-kapitalismen

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    Resumé

    English appears to be ›the‹ lingua franca of the world at present. But English is far from the only language relevant for transnational communication under the conditions of high-tech capitalism. Ironically, technical development (as manifest in the increasingly multilingual and multiscript character of the World Wide Web) makes high-tech capitalism less dependent on the existence of a single world language. The special status of English today is seen as a form of hegemony that makes its dominance appear as natural and unquestioned. Haberland uses historical examples of dominant languages in Europe (Greek, Latin) to argue that language hegemonies develop out of political, economical and military hegemony but take on a life of their own that can outlast the dominance relations that helped to create it. Some of the problems of the existence of a hegemonic language are discussed and a warning is made against language protectionism.
    OriginalsprogTysk
    TidsskriftDas Argument
    Vol/bind55
    Udgave nummer6
    Sider (fra-til)830-839
    Antal sider10
    ISSN0004-1157
    StatusUdgivet - dec. 2013

    Emneord

    • engelsk
    • hegemoni
    • globalisme
    • sproglige hegemonier

    Citer dette

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    Englisch als ›Welt‹-Sprache im Hightech-Kapitalismus. / Haberland, Hartmut.

    I: Das Argument, Bind 55, Nr. 6, 12.2013, s. 830-839.

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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