Developing a comprehensive and sustainable integration strategy for Syrian refugee children in Denmark

Publikation: AndetUdgivelser på nettet - Net-publikationForskningpeer review

Resumé

A 2013 United Nations Refugee Agency report entitled The Future of Syria stated that two million Syrian children have been forced into exile as a result of the persistent civil war: “The world must act to save a generation of traumatized, isolated and suffering Syrian children from catastrophe. If we do not move quickly, this generation of innocents will become lasting casualties of an appalling war”. Such a statement has found ritual credence in images of refugees braving (and perishing) in the tumultuous waters of the Mediterranean in search of a safe haven. But more recently, the possible abduction of 10,000 unaccompanied refugee children by organised trafficking syndicates has confirmed that children are indeed the most vulnerable when in exile. In view of this critical problematique a workshop was organized by International Alert, Copenhagen University and Roskilde University and hosted by the latter on 25—26 February 2016. Academics, NGO and UN practitioners, and representatives of municipalities from both Denmark and the Middle East met for an intensive dialogue on six main themes.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
Publikationsdato13 apr. 2016
StatusUdgivet - 13 apr. 2016

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    title = "Developing a comprehensive and sustainable integration strategy for Syrian refugee children in Denmark",
    abstract = "A 2013 United Nations Refugee Agency report entitled The Future of Syria stated that two million Syrian children have been forced into exile as a result of the persistent civil war: “The world must act to save a generation of traumatized, isolated and suffering Syrian children from catastrophe. If we do not move quickly, this generation of innocents will become lasting casualties of an appalling war”. Such a statement has found ritual credence in images of refugees braving (and perishing) in the tumultuous waters of the Mediterranean in search of a safe haven. But more recently, the possible abduction of 10,000 unaccompanied refugee children by organised trafficking syndicates has confirmed that children are indeed the most vulnerable when in exile. In view of this critical problematique a workshop was organized by International Alert, Copenhagen University and Roskilde University and hosted by the latter on 25—26 February 2016. Academics, NGO and UN practitioners, and representatives of municipalities from both Denmark and the Middle East met for an intensive dialogue on six main themes.",
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    Developing a comprehensive and sustainable integration strategy for Syrian refugee children in Denmark. / Pace, Michelle.

    2016, Blog post.

    Publikation: AndetUdgivelser på nettet - Net-publikationForskningpeer review

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    N2 - A 2013 United Nations Refugee Agency report entitled The Future of Syria stated that two million Syrian children have been forced into exile as a result of the persistent civil war: “The world must act to save a generation of traumatized, isolated and suffering Syrian children from catastrophe. If we do not move quickly, this generation of innocents will become lasting casualties of an appalling war”. Such a statement has found ritual credence in images of refugees braving (and perishing) in the tumultuous waters of the Mediterranean in search of a safe haven. But more recently, the possible abduction of 10,000 unaccompanied refugee children by organised trafficking syndicates has confirmed that children are indeed the most vulnerable when in exile. In view of this critical problematique a workshop was organized by International Alert, Copenhagen University and Roskilde University and hosted by the latter on 25—26 February 2016. Academics, NGO and UN practitioners, and representatives of municipalities from both Denmark and the Middle East met for an intensive dialogue on six main themes.

    AB - A 2013 United Nations Refugee Agency report entitled The Future of Syria stated that two million Syrian children have been forced into exile as a result of the persistent civil war: “The world must act to save a generation of traumatized, isolated and suffering Syrian children from catastrophe. If we do not move quickly, this generation of innocents will become lasting casualties of an appalling war”. Such a statement has found ritual credence in images of refugees braving (and perishing) in the tumultuous waters of the Mediterranean in search of a safe haven. But more recently, the possible abduction of 10,000 unaccompanied refugee children by organised trafficking syndicates has confirmed that children are indeed the most vulnerable when in exile. In view of this critical problematique a workshop was organized by International Alert, Copenhagen University and Roskilde University and hosted by the latter on 25—26 February 2016. Academics, NGO and UN practitioners, and representatives of municipalities from both Denmark and the Middle East met for an intensive dialogue on six main themes.

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    KW - entrepreneurship

    KW - radicalization

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    KW - Jordan

    KW - Turkey

    KW - trauma

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    KW - home country

    KW - host country

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