Death patterns during the 1918 influenza pandemic in Chile

Gerardo Chowell, Lone Simonsen, J. Flores, M.A. Miller, Cecile Viboud

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

Scarce information about the epidemiology of historical influenza pandemics in South America prevents complete understanding of pandemic patterns throughout the continent and across different climatic zones. To fill gaps with regard to spatiotemporal patterns of deaths associated with the 1918 influenza pandemic in Chile, we reviewed archival records. We found evidence that multiple pandemic waves at various times of the year and of varying intensities occurred during 1918–1921 and that influenza-related excess deaths peaked during July–August 1919. Pandemic-associated mortality rates were elevated for all age groups, including for adults >50 years of age; elevation from baseline was highest for young adults. Overall, the rate of excess deaths from the pandemic was estimated at 0.94% in Chile, similar to rates reported elsewhere in Latin America, but rates varied ≈10-fold across provinces. Patterns of death during the pandemic were affected by variation in host-specific susceptibility, population density, baseline death rate, and climate.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftEmerging Infectious Diseases
Vol/bind20
Udgave nummer11
Sider (fra-til)1803-1811
Antal sider9
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2014
Udgivet eksterntJa

Citer dette

Chowell, Gerardo ; Simonsen, Lone ; Flores, J. ; Miller, M.A. ; Viboud, Cecile. / Death patterns during the 1918 influenza pandemic in Chile. I: Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2014 ; Bind 20, Nr. 11. s. 1803-1811.
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abstract = "Scarce information about the epidemiology of historical influenza pandemics in South America prevents complete understanding of pandemic patterns throughout the continent and across different climatic zones. To fill gaps with regard to spatiotemporal patterns of deaths associated with the 1918 influenza pandemic in Chile, we reviewed archival records. We found evidence that multiple pandemic waves at various times of the year and of varying intensities occurred during 1918–1921 and that influenza-related excess deaths peaked during July–August 1919. Pandemic-associated mortality rates were elevated for all age groups, including for adults >50 years of age; elevation from baseline was highest for young adults. Overall, the rate of excess deaths from the pandemic was estimated at 0.94{\%} in Chile, similar to rates reported elsewhere in Latin America, but rates varied ≈10-fold across provinces. Patterns of death during the pandemic were affected by variation in host-specific susceptibility, population density, baseline death rate, and climate.",
author = "Gerardo Chowell and Lone Simonsen and J. Flores and M.A. Miller and Cecile Viboud",
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Death patterns during the 1918 influenza pandemic in Chile. / Chowell, Gerardo; Simonsen, Lone; Flores, J.; Miller, M.A.; Viboud, Cecile.

I: Emerging Infectious Diseases, Bind 20, Nr. 11, 2014, s. 1803-1811.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Death patterns during the 1918 influenza pandemic in Chile

AU - Chowell, Gerardo

AU - Simonsen, Lone

AU - Flores, J.

AU - Miller, M.A.

AU - Viboud, Cecile

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - Scarce information about the epidemiology of historical influenza pandemics in South America prevents complete understanding of pandemic patterns throughout the continent and across different climatic zones. To fill gaps with regard to spatiotemporal patterns of deaths associated with the 1918 influenza pandemic in Chile, we reviewed archival records. We found evidence that multiple pandemic waves at various times of the year and of varying intensities occurred during 1918–1921 and that influenza-related excess deaths peaked during July–August 1919. Pandemic-associated mortality rates were elevated for all age groups, including for adults >50 years of age; elevation from baseline was highest for young adults. Overall, the rate of excess deaths from the pandemic was estimated at 0.94% in Chile, similar to rates reported elsewhere in Latin America, but rates varied ≈10-fold across provinces. Patterns of death during the pandemic were affected by variation in host-specific susceptibility, population density, baseline death rate, and climate.

AB - Scarce information about the epidemiology of historical influenza pandemics in South America prevents complete understanding of pandemic patterns throughout the continent and across different climatic zones. To fill gaps with regard to spatiotemporal patterns of deaths associated with the 1918 influenza pandemic in Chile, we reviewed archival records. We found evidence that multiple pandemic waves at various times of the year and of varying intensities occurred during 1918–1921 and that influenza-related excess deaths peaked during July–August 1919. Pandemic-associated mortality rates were elevated for all age groups, including for adults >50 years of age; elevation from baseline was highest for young adults. Overall, the rate of excess deaths from the pandemic was estimated at 0.94% in Chile, similar to rates reported elsewhere in Latin America, but rates varied ≈10-fold across provinces. Patterns of death during the pandemic were affected by variation in host-specific susceptibility, population density, baseline death rate, and climate.

U2 - 10.3201/eid2011.130632

DO - 10.3201/eid2011.130632

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