Continuum Nanofluidics

Jesper Schmidt Hansen, Jeppe C. Dyre, Peter Daivis, Todd Billy, Henrik Bruus

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

This paper introduces the fundamental continuum theory governing momentum transport in isotropic nanofluidic systems. The theory is an extension of the classical Navier–Stokes equation, and includes coupling between translational and rotational degrees of freedom as well as nonlocal response functions that incorporate spatial correlations. The continuum theory is compared with molecular dynamics simulation data for both relaxation processes and fluid flows, showing excellent agreement on the nanometer length scale. We also present practical tools to estimate when the extended theory should be used. It is shown that in the wall–fluid region the fluid molecules align with the wall, and in this region the isotropic model may fail and a full anisotropic description is necessary
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftLangmuir
Vol/bind31
Sider (fra-til)13275-13289
ISSN0743-7463
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2015

Citer dette

Hansen, Jesper Schmidt ; Dyre, Jeppe C. ; Daivis, Peter ; Billy, Todd ; Bruus, Henrik. / Continuum Nanofluidics. I: Langmuir. 2015 ; Bind 31. s. 13275-13289.
@article{6a0e5acd22fd46ed9645e3e7ac2e7dd6,
title = "Continuum Nanofluidics",
abstract = "This paper introduces the fundamental continuum theory governing momentum transport in isotropic nanofluidic systems. The theory is an extension of the classical Navier–Stokes equation, and includes coupling between translational and rotational degrees of freedom as well as nonlocal response functions that incorporate spatial correlations. The continuum theory is compared with molecular dynamics simulation data for both relaxation processes and fluid flows, showing excellent agreement on the nanometer length scale. We also present practical tools to estimate when the extended theory should be used. It is shown that in the wall–fluid region the fluid molecules align with the wall, and in this region the isotropic model may fail and a full anisotropic description is necessary",
author = "Hansen, {Jesper Schmidt} and Dyre, {Jeppe C.} and Peter Daivis and Todd Billy and Henrik Bruus",
year = "2015",
doi = "10.1021/acs.langmuir.5b02237",
language = "English",
volume = "31",
pages = "13275--13289",
journal = "Langmuir",
issn = "0743-7463",
publisher = "American Chemical Society",

}

Hansen, JS, Dyre, JC, Daivis, P, Billy, T & Bruus, H 2015, 'Continuum Nanofluidics', Langmuir, bind 31, s. 13275-13289. https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.langmuir.5b02237

Continuum Nanofluidics. / Hansen, Jesper Schmidt; Dyre, Jeppe C.; Daivis, Peter; Billy, Todd; Bruus, Henrik.

I: Langmuir, Bind 31, 2015, s. 13275-13289.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Continuum Nanofluidics

AU - Hansen, Jesper Schmidt

AU - Dyre, Jeppe C.

AU - Daivis, Peter

AU - Billy, Todd

AU - Bruus, Henrik

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - This paper introduces the fundamental continuum theory governing momentum transport in isotropic nanofluidic systems. The theory is an extension of the classical Navier–Stokes equation, and includes coupling between translational and rotational degrees of freedom as well as nonlocal response functions that incorporate spatial correlations. The continuum theory is compared with molecular dynamics simulation data for both relaxation processes and fluid flows, showing excellent agreement on the nanometer length scale. We also present practical tools to estimate when the extended theory should be used. It is shown that in the wall–fluid region the fluid molecules align with the wall, and in this region the isotropic model may fail and a full anisotropic description is necessary

AB - This paper introduces the fundamental continuum theory governing momentum transport in isotropic nanofluidic systems. The theory is an extension of the classical Navier–Stokes equation, and includes coupling between translational and rotational degrees of freedom as well as nonlocal response functions that incorporate spatial correlations. The continuum theory is compared with molecular dynamics simulation data for both relaxation processes and fluid flows, showing excellent agreement on the nanometer length scale. We also present practical tools to estimate when the extended theory should be used. It is shown that in the wall–fluid region the fluid molecules align with the wall, and in this region the isotropic model may fail and a full anisotropic description is necessary

U2 - 10.1021/acs.langmuir.5b02237

DO - 10.1021/acs.langmuir.5b02237

M3 - Journal article

VL - 31

SP - 13275

EP - 13289

JO - Langmuir

JF - Langmuir

SN - 0743-7463

ER -