Conceptualizing Change in Journalism Studies: Why Change at All?

Chris Peters, Matt Carlson

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

A virtue of being a journalism scholar is that we rarely need to defend – or even explain – our topic of inquiry. When new acquaintances ask what we do and we respond that we study news and journalism, our inquisitors are usually happy to engage in conversation about it. Such discussions frequently turn to concern or confusion about the present state of news, the many changes that are happening, and what lies ahead in its future. While it’s certain that not everyone shares a similar level of interest in the topic – and some surely don’t care at all – what is clear is that the salience of journalistic change as a mode of understanding news is plainly visible. It is not a topic created by scholars, but a condition caused by the exigencies of the news media industry, occurring with different valances in different parts of the world. It is no wonder then that change, innovation, technological advancement, and future predictions occupy such a prominent position in contemporary journalism research. This special section of Journalism: Theory, practice and criticism recognizes the change-focussed nature of our scholarship and reflects upon the pressures, possibilities, and perils presented by this orientation.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftJournalism
Vol/bind20
Udgave nummer5
Sider (fra-til)637-641
ISSN1464-8849
DOI
StatusUdgivet - maj 2019

Citer dette

Peters, Chris ; Carlson, Matt. / Conceptualizing Change in Journalism Studies : Why Change at All?. I: Journalism. 2019 ; Bind 20, Nr. 5. s. 637-641.
@article{61ba0a16b58c40129f50fc525b173772,
title = "Conceptualizing Change in Journalism Studies: Why Change at All?",
abstract = "A virtue of being a journalism scholar is that we rarely need to defend – or even explain – our topic of inquiry. When new acquaintances ask what we do and we respond that we study news and journalism, our inquisitors are usually happy to engage in conversation about it. Such discussions frequently turn to concern or confusion about the present state of news, the many changes that are happening, and what lies ahead in its future. While it’s certain that not everyone shares a similar level of interest in the topic – and some surely don’t care at all – what is clear is that the salience of journalistic change as a mode of understanding news is plainly visible. It is not a topic created by scholars, but a condition caused by the exigencies of the news media industry, occurring with different valances in different parts of the world. It is no wonder then that change, innovation, technological advancement, and future predictions occupy such a prominent position in contemporary journalism research. This special section of Journalism: Theory, practice and criticism recognizes the change-focussed nature of our scholarship and reflects upon the pressures, possibilities, and perils presented by this orientation.",
author = "Chris Peters and Matt Carlson",
year = "2019",
month = "5",
doi = "10.1177/1464884918760674",
language = "English",
volume = "20",
pages = "637--641",
journal = "Journalism",
issn = "1464-8849",
publisher = "SAGE Publications",
number = "5",

}

Conceptualizing Change in Journalism Studies : Why Change at All? / Peters, Chris; Carlson, Matt.

I: Journalism, Bind 20, Nr. 5, 05.2019, s. 637-641.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Conceptualizing Change in Journalism Studies

T2 - Why Change at All?

AU - Peters, Chris

AU - Carlson, Matt

PY - 2019/5

Y1 - 2019/5

N2 - A virtue of being a journalism scholar is that we rarely need to defend – or even explain – our topic of inquiry. When new acquaintances ask what we do and we respond that we study news and journalism, our inquisitors are usually happy to engage in conversation about it. Such discussions frequently turn to concern or confusion about the present state of news, the many changes that are happening, and what lies ahead in its future. While it’s certain that not everyone shares a similar level of interest in the topic – and some surely don’t care at all – what is clear is that the salience of journalistic change as a mode of understanding news is plainly visible. It is not a topic created by scholars, but a condition caused by the exigencies of the news media industry, occurring with different valances in different parts of the world. It is no wonder then that change, innovation, technological advancement, and future predictions occupy such a prominent position in contemporary journalism research. This special section of Journalism: Theory, practice and criticism recognizes the change-focussed nature of our scholarship and reflects upon the pressures, possibilities, and perils presented by this orientation.

AB - A virtue of being a journalism scholar is that we rarely need to defend – or even explain – our topic of inquiry. When new acquaintances ask what we do and we respond that we study news and journalism, our inquisitors are usually happy to engage in conversation about it. Such discussions frequently turn to concern or confusion about the present state of news, the many changes that are happening, and what lies ahead in its future. While it’s certain that not everyone shares a similar level of interest in the topic – and some surely don’t care at all – what is clear is that the salience of journalistic change as a mode of understanding news is plainly visible. It is not a topic created by scholars, but a condition caused by the exigencies of the news media industry, occurring with different valances in different parts of the world. It is no wonder then that change, innovation, technological advancement, and future predictions occupy such a prominent position in contemporary journalism research. This special section of Journalism: Theory, practice and criticism recognizes the change-focussed nature of our scholarship and reflects upon the pressures, possibilities, and perils presented by this orientation.

U2 - 10.1177/1464884918760674

DO - 10.1177/1464884918760674

M3 - Journal article

VL - 20

SP - 637

EP - 641

JO - Journalism

JF - Journalism

SN - 1464-8849

IS - 5

ER -