Challenges for IT-supported shared care

A qualitative analyses of two shared care initiatives for diabetes treatment in Denmark

Maren Fich Granlien, Jesper Simonsen

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

    Resumé

    Purpose: To investigate the circumstances as to why it is so difficult in the primary care sector to implement IT based infrastructures supporting shared care.

    Case study: The qualitative analysis includes two separate case studies of IT-supported shared care implemented in two different regions of Denmark throughout 2005. The study comprises 21 interviews and 35 hours of observations. The data were analysed through a coding process that led to the emergence of three main challenges impeding the organisational implementation of IT-supported shared care.

    Discussion and conclusion: The two cases faced the same challenges that led to the same problem: The secondary care sector quickly adopted the system while the primary sector was far more sceptical towards using it. In both cases, we observe a discrepancy of needs satisfied, especially with regard to the primary care sector and its general practitioners which hinder bridging the primary sector (general practitioners) and the secondary sector (hospitals and outpatient clinics). Especially the needs associated with the primary sector were not being satisfied. We discovered three main challenges related to bridging the gap between the two sectors: (1) Poor integration with the general practitioners' existing IT systems; (2) low compatibility with general practitioners' work ethic; (3) and discrepancy between the number of diabetes patients and the related need for shared care. We conclude that development of IT-supported shared care must recognise the underlying and significant differences between the primary and secondary care sectors: If IT-supported shared care does not meet the needs of the general practitioners as well as the needs of the secondary care sector the initiative will fail.

    OriginalsprogEngelsk
    TidsskriftInternational Journal of Integrated Care
    Vol/bind7
    Udgave nummerApril-June
    Antal sider13
    ISSN1568-4156
    StatusUdgivet - 2007

    Emneord

    • shared care
    • IT-support
    • qualitative case study
    • secondary care sector
    • primary care sector
    • organisational implementation
    • diabetes
    • challenges

    Citer dette

    @article{ce1cd220185e11dcb503000ea68e967b,
    title = "Challenges for IT-supported shared care: A qualitative analyses of two shared care initiatives for diabetes treatment in Denmark",
    abstract = "Purpose: To investigate the circumstances as to why it is so difficult in the primary care sector to implement IT based infrastructures supporting shared care. Case study: The qualitative analysis includes two separate case studies of IT-supported shared care implemented in two different regions of Denmark throughout 2005. The study comprises 21 interviews and 35 hours of observations. The data were analysed through a coding process that led to the emergence of three main challenges impeding the organisational implementation of IT-supported shared care. Discussion and conclusion: The two cases faced the same challenges that led to the same problem: The secondary care sector quickly adopted the system while the primary sector was far more sceptical towards using it. In both cases, we observe a discrepancy of needs satisfied, especially with regard to the primary care sector and its general practitioners which hinder bridging the primary sector (general practitioners) and the secondary sector (hospitals and outpatient clinics). Especially the needs associated with the primary sector were not being satisfied. We discovered three main challenges related to bridging the gap between the two sectors: (1) Poor integration with the general practitioners' existing IT systems; (2) low compatibility with general practitioners' work ethic; (3) and discrepancy between the number of diabetes patients and the related need for shared care. We conclude that development of IT-supported shared care must recognise the underlying and significant differences between the primary and secondary care sectors: If IT-supported shared care does not meet the needs of the general practitioners as well as the needs of the secondary care sector the initiative will fail.",
    keywords = "shared care, IT-support, qualitative case study, secondary care sector, primary care sector, organisational implementation, diabetes, challenges, shared care, IT-support, qualitative case study, secondary care sector, primary care sector, organisational implementation, diabetes, challenges",
    author = "Granlien, {Maren Fich} and Jesper Simonsen",
    year = "2007",
    language = "English",
    volume = "7",
    journal = "International Journal of Integrated Care",
    issn = "1568-4156",
    publisher = "Utrecht University Library Open Access Journals",
    number = "April-June",

    }

    Challenges for IT-supported shared care : A qualitative analyses of two shared care initiatives for diabetes treatment in Denmark. / Granlien, Maren Fich; Simonsen, Jesper.

    I: International Journal of Integrated Care, Bind 7, Nr. April-June, 2007.

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Challenges for IT-supported shared care

    T2 - A qualitative analyses of two shared care initiatives for diabetes treatment in Denmark

    AU - Granlien, Maren Fich

    AU - Simonsen, Jesper

    PY - 2007

    Y1 - 2007

    N2 - Purpose: To investigate the circumstances as to why it is so difficult in the primary care sector to implement IT based infrastructures supporting shared care. Case study: The qualitative analysis includes two separate case studies of IT-supported shared care implemented in two different regions of Denmark throughout 2005. The study comprises 21 interviews and 35 hours of observations. The data were analysed through a coding process that led to the emergence of three main challenges impeding the organisational implementation of IT-supported shared care. Discussion and conclusion: The two cases faced the same challenges that led to the same problem: The secondary care sector quickly adopted the system while the primary sector was far more sceptical towards using it. In both cases, we observe a discrepancy of needs satisfied, especially with regard to the primary care sector and its general practitioners which hinder bridging the primary sector (general practitioners) and the secondary sector (hospitals and outpatient clinics). Especially the needs associated with the primary sector were not being satisfied. We discovered three main challenges related to bridging the gap between the two sectors: (1) Poor integration with the general practitioners' existing IT systems; (2) low compatibility with general practitioners' work ethic; (3) and discrepancy between the number of diabetes patients and the related need for shared care. We conclude that development of IT-supported shared care must recognise the underlying and significant differences between the primary and secondary care sectors: If IT-supported shared care does not meet the needs of the general practitioners as well as the needs of the secondary care sector the initiative will fail.

    AB - Purpose: To investigate the circumstances as to why it is so difficult in the primary care sector to implement IT based infrastructures supporting shared care. Case study: The qualitative analysis includes two separate case studies of IT-supported shared care implemented in two different regions of Denmark throughout 2005. The study comprises 21 interviews and 35 hours of observations. The data were analysed through a coding process that led to the emergence of three main challenges impeding the organisational implementation of IT-supported shared care. Discussion and conclusion: The two cases faced the same challenges that led to the same problem: The secondary care sector quickly adopted the system while the primary sector was far more sceptical towards using it. In both cases, we observe a discrepancy of needs satisfied, especially with regard to the primary care sector and its general practitioners which hinder bridging the primary sector (general practitioners) and the secondary sector (hospitals and outpatient clinics). Especially the needs associated with the primary sector were not being satisfied. We discovered three main challenges related to bridging the gap between the two sectors: (1) Poor integration with the general practitioners' existing IT systems; (2) low compatibility with general practitioners' work ethic; (3) and discrepancy between the number of diabetes patients and the related need for shared care. We conclude that development of IT-supported shared care must recognise the underlying and significant differences between the primary and secondary care sectors: If IT-supported shared care does not meet the needs of the general practitioners as well as the needs of the secondary care sector the initiative will fail.

    KW - shared care

    KW - IT-support

    KW - qualitative case study

    KW - secondary care sector

    KW - primary care sector

    KW - organisational implementation

    KW - diabetes

    KW - challenges

    KW - shared care

    KW - IT-support

    KW - qualitative case study

    KW - secondary care sector

    KW - primary care sector

    KW - organisational implementation

    KW - diabetes

    KW - challenges

    M3 - Journal article

    VL - 7

    JO - International Journal of Integrated Care

    JF - International Journal of Integrated Care

    SN - 1568-4156

    IS - April-June

    ER -