Blood pressure and blood flow variation during postural change from sitting to standing: model development and validation

M.S. Olufsen, Johnny T. Ottesen, H.T. Tran, L.M. Ellwein, L.A. Lipsitz, V Novak

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

    Resumé

    Udgivelsesdato: October
    OriginalsprogEngelsk
    TidsskriftJournal of Applied Physiology
    Vol/bind99
    Sider (fra-til)1523-1537
    Antal sider14
    ISSN8750-7587
    StatusUdgivet - 2005

    Bibliografisk note

    Paper id:: doi:10.1152/japplphysiol.00177.2005

    Citer dette

    @article{a84384f052bf11dba4bc000ea68e967b,
    title = "Blood pressure and blood flow variation during postural change from sitting to standing: model development and validation",
    abstract = "Short-term cardiovascular responses to postural change from sitting to standing involve complex interactions between the autonomic nervous system, which regulates blood pressure, and cerebral autoregulation, which maintains cerebral perfusion. We present a mathematical model that can predict dynamic changes in beat-to-beat arterial blood pressure and middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity during postural change from sitting to standing. Our cardiovascular model utilizes 11 compartments to describe blood pressure, blood flow, compliance, and resistance in the heart and systemic circulation. To include dynamics due to the pulsatile nature of blood pressure and blood flow, resistances in the large systemic arteries are modeled using nonlinear functions of pressure. A physiologically based submodel is used to describe effects of gravity on venous blood pooling during postural change. Two types of control mechanisms are included: 1) autonomic regulation mediated by sympathetic and parasympathetic responses, which affect heart rate, cardiac contractility, resistance, and compliance, and 2) autoregulation mediated by responses to local changes in myogenic tone, metabolic demand, and CO2 concentration, which affect cerebrovascular resistance. Finally, we formulate an inverse least-squares problem to estimate parameters and demonstrate that our mathematical model is in agreement with physiological data from a young subject during postural change from sitting to standing.",
    author = "M.S. Olufsen and Ottesen, {Johnny T.} and H.T. Tran and L.M. Ellwein and L.A. Lipsitz and V Novak",
    note = "Paper id:: doi:10.1152/japplphysiol.00177.2005",
    year = "2005",
    language = "English",
    volume = "99",
    pages = "1523--1537",
    journal = "Journal of Applied Physiology",
    issn = "8750-7587",
    publisher = "American Physiological Society",

    }

    Blood pressure and blood flow variation during postural change from sitting to standing: model development and validation. / Olufsen, M.S.; Ottesen, Johnny T.; Tran, H.T.; Ellwein, L.M.; Lipsitz, L.A.; Novak, V.

    I: Journal of Applied Physiology, Bind 99, 2005, s. 1523-1537.

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Blood pressure and blood flow variation during postural change from sitting to standing: model development and validation

    AU - Olufsen, M.S.

    AU - Ottesen, Johnny T.

    AU - Tran, H.T.

    AU - Ellwein, L.M.

    AU - Lipsitz, L.A.

    AU - Novak, V

    N1 - Paper id:: doi:10.1152/japplphysiol.00177.2005

    PY - 2005

    Y1 - 2005

    N2 - Short-term cardiovascular responses to postural change from sitting to standing involve complex interactions between the autonomic nervous system, which regulates blood pressure, and cerebral autoregulation, which maintains cerebral perfusion. We present a mathematical model that can predict dynamic changes in beat-to-beat arterial blood pressure and middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity during postural change from sitting to standing. Our cardiovascular model utilizes 11 compartments to describe blood pressure, blood flow, compliance, and resistance in the heart and systemic circulation. To include dynamics due to the pulsatile nature of blood pressure and blood flow, resistances in the large systemic arteries are modeled using nonlinear functions of pressure. A physiologically based submodel is used to describe effects of gravity on venous blood pooling during postural change. Two types of control mechanisms are included: 1) autonomic regulation mediated by sympathetic and parasympathetic responses, which affect heart rate, cardiac contractility, resistance, and compliance, and 2) autoregulation mediated by responses to local changes in myogenic tone, metabolic demand, and CO2 concentration, which affect cerebrovascular resistance. Finally, we formulate an inverse least-squares problem to estimate parameters and demonstrate that our mathematical model is in agreement with physiological data from a young subject during postural change from sitting to standing.

    AB - Short-term cardiovascular responses to postural change from sitting to standing involve complex interactions between the autonomic nervous system, which regulates blood pressure, and cerebral autoregulation, which maintains cerebral perfusion. We present a mathematical model that can predict dynamic changes in beat-to-beat arterial blood pressure and middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity during postural change from sitting to standing. Our cardiovascular model utilizes 11 compartments to describe blood pressure, blood flow, compliance, and resistance in the heart and systemic circulation. To include dynamics due to the pulsatile nature of blood pressure and blood flow, resistances in the large systemic arteries are modeled using nonlinear functions of pressure. A physiologically based submodel is used to describe effects of gravity on venous blood pooling during postural change. Two types of control mechanisms are included: 1) autonomic regulation mediated by sympathetic and parasympathetic responses, which affect heart rate, cardiac contractility, resistance, and compliance, and 2) autoregulation mediated by responses to local changes in myogenic tone, metabolic demand, and CO2 concentration, which affect cerebrovascular resistance. Finally, we formulate an inverse least-squares problem to estimate parameters and demonstrate that our mathematical model is in agreement with physiological data from a young subject during postural change from sitting to standing.

    M3 - Journal article

    VL - 99

    SP - 1523

    EP - 1537

    JO - Journal of Applied Physiology

    JF - Journal of Applied Physiology

    SN - 8750-7587

    ER -