Bioethics in Denmark Moving from First- to Second-Order Analysis?

Morten Ebbe Juul Nielsen, Martin Marchman Andersen

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

    Resumé

    This article examines two current debates in Denmark-assisted suicide and the prioritization of health resources-and proposes that such controversial bioethical issues call for distinct philosophical analyses: first-order examinations, or an applied philosophy approach, and second-order examinations, what might be called a political philosophical approach. The authors argue that although first-order examination plays an important role in teasing out different moral points of view, in contemporary democratic societies, few, if any, bioethical questions can be resolved satisfactorily by means of first-order analyses alone, and that bioethics needs to engage more closely with second-order enquiries and the question of legitimacy in general.
    OriginalsprogEngelsk
    TidsskriftCambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics
    Vol/bind23
    Udgave nummer3
    Sider (fra-til)326-333
    ISSN0963-1801
    DOI
    StatusUdgivet - 2014

    Emneord

    • Assisted suicide
    • prioritization
    • health resources
    • philosophical analysis

    Citer dette

    Nielsen, Morten Ebbe Juul ; Andersen, Martin Marchman. / Bioethics in Denmark Moving from First- to Second-Order Analysis?. I: Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics. 2014 ; Bind 23, Nr. 3. s. 326-333.
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    Bioethics in Denmark Moving from First- to Second-Order Analysis? / Nielsen, Morten Ebbe Juul; Andersen, Martin Marchman.

    I: Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics, Bind 23, Nr. 3, 2014, s. 326-333.

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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