Biochar carbon stability and effect on greenhouse gas emissions

Esben Wilson Bruun, Andrew Cross, Jim Hammond, Victoria Nelissen, Daniel P. Rasse, Henrik Hauggaard-Nielsen

Publikation: Bidrag til bog/antologi/rapportBidrag til bog/antologiForskningpeer review

Resumé

As demonstrated by several scientific studies there is no doubt that biochar in general is very recalcitrant compared to other organic matter additions and soil organic matter fractions and also that it is possible to sequester carbon at a climate change relevant time scale (~100 years or more) by soil application of biochar. However, the carbon stability of biochar in soil is strongly correlated with the degree of thermal alteration of the original feedstock (the lower the temperature, the larger the labile fraction) and in depth understanding of the technology used and its effect on the biochar quality is necessary in order to produce the most beneficial biochars for soil application. Beside carbon sequestration in soil biochar may improve the GHG balance by reducing N2O and CH4 soil emissions, although contrasting results are found in the literature. The mechanisms behind these reductions remain unclear and more research is required in order to investigate the various hypotheses in more detail, and to unravel the complex interaction between biochar, crop and soil, especially under field conditions. In conclusion, our current knowledge is largely based on short-term lab studies and pot experiments, which have provided detailed insight in certain processes and aspects of biochar application to soils, but suffer from large uncertainties when scaled-up to the farmers field level. In order to produce more realistic scenarios of the potential impact of biochar on C sequestration and soil GHG emissions there is a need to bring biochar research up to the field-scale, and to perform longer-term studies.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TitelBiochar in European Soils and Agriculture : Science and Practice
RedaktørerSimon Schackley, Greet Ruysschaert, Kor Zwart, Bruno Glaser
Antal sider18
Udgivelses stedLondon
ForlagRoutledge
Publikationsdato2016
Sider165-183
Kapitel7
ISBN (Trykt)978-0-415-71166-1
ISBN (Elektronisk)978-1-315-88446-2
StatusUdgivet - 2016

Emneord

  • biochar
  • Agricultural changes
  • Soil carbon sequestration
  • Farmer participation
  • Field Experiment

Citer dette

Bruun, E. W., Cross, A., Hammond, J., Nelissen, V., Rasse, D. P., & Hauggaard-Nielsen, H. (2016). Biochar carbon stability and effect on greenhouse gas emissions. I S. Schackley, G. Ruysschaert, K. Zwart, & B. Glaser (red.), Biochar in European Soils and Agriculture: Science and Practice (s. 165-183). London: Routledge.
Bruun, Esben Wilson ; Cross, Andrew ; Hammond, Jim ; Nelissen, Victoria ; Rasse, Daniel P. ; Hauggaard-Nielsen, Henrik. / Biochar carbon stability and effect on greenhouse gas emissions. Biochar in European Soils and Agriculture: Science and Practice. red. / Simon Schackley ; Greet Ruysschaert ; Kor Zwart ; Bruno Glaser. London : Routledge, 2016. s. 165-183
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Bruun, EW, Cross, A, Hammond, J, Nelissen, V, Rasse, DP & Hauggaard-Nielsen, H 2016, Biochar carbon stability and effect on greenhouse gas emissions. i S Schackley, G Ruysschaert, K Zwart & B Glaser (red), Biochar in European Soils and Agriculture: Science and Practice. Routledge, London, s. 165-183.

Biochar carbon stability and effect on greenhouse gas emissions. / Bruun, Esben Wilson; Cross, Andrew; Hammond, Jim; Nelissen, Victoria; Rasse, Daniel P.; Hauggaard-Nielsen, Henrik.

Biochar in European Soils and Agriculture: Science and Practice. red. / Simon Schackley; Greet Ruysschaert; Kor Zwart; Bruno Glaser. London : Routledge, 2016. s. 165-183.

Publikation: Bidrag til bog/antologi/rapportBidrag til bog/antologiForskningpeer review

TY - CHAP

T1 - Biochar carbon stability and effect on greenhouse gas emissions

AU - Bruun, Esben Wilson

AU - Cross, Andrew

AU - Hammond, Jim

AU - Nelissen, Victoria

AU - Rasse, Daniel P.

AU - Hauggaard-Nielsen, Henrik

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - As demonstrated by several scientific studies there is no doubt that biochar in general is very recalcitrant compared to other organic matter additions and soil organic matter fractions and also that it is possible to sequester carbon at a climate change relevant time scale (~100 years or more) by soil application of biochar. However, the carbon stability of biochar in soil is strongly correlated with the degree of thermal alteration of the original feedstock (the lower the temperature, the larger the labile fraction) and in depth understanding of the technology used and its effect on the biochar quality is necessary in order to produce the most beneficial biochars for soil application. Beside carbon sequestration in soil biochar may improve the GHG balance by reducing N2O and CH4 soil emissions, although contrasting results are found in the literature. The mechanisms behind these reductions remain unclear and more research is required in order to investigate the various hypotheses in more detail, and to unravel the complex interaction between biochar, crop and soil, especially under field conditions. In conclusion, our current knowledge is largely based on short-term lab studies and pot experiments, which have provided detailed insight in certain processes and aspects of biochar application to soils, but suffer from large uncertainties when scaled-up to the farmers field level. In order to produce more realistic scenarios of the potential impact of biochar on C sequestration and soil GHG emissions there is a need to bring biochar research up to the field-scale, and to perform longer-term studies.

AB - As demonstrated by several scientific studies there is no doubt that biochar in general is very recalcitrant compared to other organic matter additions and soil organic matter fractions and also that it is possible to sequester carbon at a climate change relevant time scale (~100 years or more) by soil application of biochar. However, the carbon stability of biochar in soil is strongly correlated with the degree of thermal alteration of the original feedstock (the lower the temperature, the larger the labile fraction) and in depth understanding of the technology used and its effect on the biochar quality is necessary in order to produce the most beneficial biochars for soil application. Beside carbon sequestration in soil biochar may improve the GHG balance by reducing N2O and CH4 soil emissions, although contrasting results are found in the literature. The mechanisms behind these reductions remain unclear and more research is required in order to investigate the various hypotheses in more detail, and to unravel the complex interaction between biochar, crop and soil, especially under field conditions. In conclusion, our current knowledge is largely based on short-term lab studies and pot experiments, which have provided detailed insight in certain processes and aspects of biochar application to soils, but suffer from large uncertainties when scaled-up to the farmers field level. In order to produce more realistic scenarios of the potential impact of biochar on C sequestration and soil GHG emissions there is a need to bring biochar research up to the field-scale, and to perform longer-term studies.

KW - biochar

KW - Agricultural changes

KW - Soil carbon sequestration

KW - Farmer participation

KW - Field Experiment

KW - biochar

KW - Field Experiment

KW - Farmer participation

KW - Agricultural changes

KW - europe

M3 - Book chapter

SN - 978-0-415-71166-1

SP - 165

EP - 183

BT - Biochar in European Soils and Agriculture

A2 - Schackley, Simon

A2 - Ruysschaert, Greet

A2 - Zwart, Kor

A2 - Glaser, Bruno

PB - Routledge

CY - London

ER -

Bruun EW, Cross A, Hammond J, Nelissen V, Rasse DP, Hauggaard-Nielsen H. Biochar carbon stability and effect on greenhouse gas emissions. I Schackley S, Ruysschaert G, Zwart K, Glaser B, red., Biochar in European Soils and Agriculture: Science and Practice. London: Routledge. 2016. s. 165-183