Bioaccumulation and Biotransformation of Triclosan and Galaxolide in the Freshwater Oligochaete Limnodrilus hoffmeisteri in a Water/Sediment Microcosm

Fengjiao Peng, Guangguo Ying, Changgui Pan, Henriette Selck, Daniel Salvito, Paul van den Brink

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

Personal care products are widely used in our daily life in considerable quantities and discharged via the down-the-drain route to aquatic environments, resulting in potential risks to aquatic organisms. We investigated bioaccumulation and biotransformation of two widely used personal care products, triclosan (TCS) and galaxolide (HHCB) spiked to sediment, in the oligochaete worm Limnodrilus hoffmeisteri in water/sediment microcosms.
After 7 days of sediment exposure to 3.1 μg of TCS or HHCB/g of dry weight sediment, the accumulation of TCS and HHCB in L. hoffmeisteri reached equilibrium, at which point the biota−sediment accumulation factors (BSAFs) were 2.07 and 2.50 for TCS and HHCB, respectively. The presence of L. hoffmeisteri significantly accelerated the dissipation of the levels of TCS and HHCB in the microcosms, with approximately 9.03 and 2.90% of TCS and HHCB, respectively, eliminated from the water/sediment systems after exposure for 14 days in the presence of worms. Two biotransformation products, methyl triclosan and triclosan O-sulfate, were identified for TCS in worm tissue, whereas only methyl triclosan was identified in the sediment. Unlike TCS, no evidence of biotransformation products was found for HHCB in either worm tissue or sediment. These experiments demonstrate that L. hoffmeisteri biotransformed TCS through methylation and sulfation, whereas HHCB biotransformation was undetectable.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftIssues in Environmental Science and Technology
Vol/bind52
Udgave nummer15
Sider (fra-til)8390-8398
Antal sider9
ISSN1350-7583
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2018

Citer dette

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title = "Bioaccumulation and Biotransformation of Triclosan and Galaxolide in the Freshwater Oligochaete Limnodrilus hoffmeisteri in a Water/Sediment Microcosm",
abstract = "Personal care products are widely used in our daily life in considerable quantities and discharged via the down-the-drain route to aquatic environments, resulting in potential risks to aquatic organisms. We investigated bioaccumulation and biotransformation of two widely used personal care products, triclosan (TCS) and galaxolide (HHCB) spiked to sediment, in the oligochaete worm Limnodrilus hoffmeisteri in water/sediment microcosms.After 7 days of sediment exposure to 3.1 μg of TCS or HHCB/g of dry weight sediment, the accumulation of TCS and HHCB in L. hoffmeisteri reached equilibrium, at which point the biota−sediment accumulation factors (BSAFs) were 2.07 and 2.50 for TCS and HHCB, respectively. The presence of L. hoffmeisteri significantly accelerated the dissipation of the levels of TCS and HHCB in the microcosms, with approximately 9.03 and 2.90{\%} of TCS and HHCB, respectively, eliminated from the water/sediment systems after exposure for 14 days in the presence of worms. Two biotransformation products, methyl triclosan and triclosan O-sulfate, were identified for TCS in worm tissue, whereas only methyl triclosan was identified in the sediment. Unlike TCS, no evidence of biotransformation products was found for HHCB in either worm tissue or sediment. These experiments demonstrate that L. hoffmeisteri biotransformed TCS through methylation and sulfation, whereas HHCB biotransformation was undetectable.",
author = "Fengjiao Peng and Guangguo Ying and Changgui Pan and Henriette Selck and Daniel Salvito and {van den Brink}, Paul",
year = "2018",
doi = "10.1021/acs.est.8b02637",
language = "English",
volume = "52",
pages = "8390--8398",
journal = "Issues in Environmental Science and Technology",
issn = "1350-7583",
publisher = "Royal Society of Chemistry",
number = "15",

}

Bioaccumulation and Biotransformation of Triclosan and Galaxolide in the Freshwater Oligochaete Limnodrilus hoffmeisteri in a Water/Sediment Microcosm. / Peng, Fengjiao; Ying, Guangguo; Pan, Changgui; Selck, Henriette; Salvito, Daniel; van den Brink, Paul.

I: Issues in Environmental Science and Technology, Bind 52, Nr. 15, 2018, s. 8390-8398.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Bioaccumulation and Biotransformation of Triclosan and Galaxolide in the Freshwater Oligochaete Limnodrilus hoffmeisteri in a Water/Sediment Microcosm

AU - Peng, Fengjiao

AU - Ying, Guangguo

AU - Pan, Changgui

AU - Selck, Henriette

AU - Salvito, Daniel

AU - van den Brink, Paul

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

N2 - Personal care products are widely used in our daily life in considerable quantities and discharged via the down-the-drain route to aquatic environments, resulting in potential risks to aquatic organisms. We investigated bioaccumulation and biotransformation of two widely used personal care products, triclosan (TCS) and galaxolide (HHCB) spiked to sediment, in the oligochaete worm Limnodrilus hoffmeisteri in water/sediment microcosms.After 7 days of sediment exposure to 3.1 μg of TCS or HHCB/g of dry weight sediment, the accumulation of TCS and HHCB in L. hoffmeisteri reached equilibrium, at which point the biota−sediment accumulation factors (BSAFs) were 2.07 and 2.50 for TCS and HHCB, respectively. The presence of L. hoffmeisteri significantly accelerated the dissipation of the levels of TCS and HHCB in the microcosms, with approximately 9.03 and 2.90% of TCS and HHCB, respectively, eliminated from the water/sediment systems after exposure for 14 days in the presence of worms. Two biotransformation products, methyl triclosan and triclosan O-sulfate, were identified for TCS in worm tissue, whereas only methyl triclosan was identified in the sediment. Unlike TCS, no evidence of biotransformation products was found for HHCB in either worm tissue or sediment. These experiments demonstrate that L. hoffmeisteri biotransformed TCS through methylation and sulfation, whereas HHCB biotransformation was undetectable.

AB - Personal care products are widely used in our daily life in considerable quantities and discharged via the down-the-drain route to aquatic environments, resulting in potential risks to aquatic organisms. We investigated bioaccumulation and biotransformation of two widely used personal care products, triclosan (TCS) and galaxolide (HHCB) spiked to sediment, in the oligochaete worm Limnodrilus hoffmeisteri in water/sediment microcosms.After 7 days of sediment exposure to 3.1 μg of TCS or HHCB/g of dry weight sediment, the accumulation of TCS and HHCB in L. hoffmeisteri reached equilibrium, at which point the biota−sediment accumulation factors (BSAFs) were 2.07 and 2.50 for TCS and HHCB, respectively. The presence of L. hoffmeisteri significantly accelerated the dissipation of the levels of TCS and HHCB in the microcosms, with approximately 9.03 and 2.90% of TCS and HHCB, respectively, eliminated from the water/sediment systems after exposure for 14 days in the presence of worms. Two biotransformation products, methyl triclosan and triclosan O-sulfate, were identified for TCS in worm tissue, whereas only methyl triclosan was identified in the sediment. Unlike TCS, no evidence of biotransformation products was found for HHCB in either worm tissue or sediment. These experiments demonstrate that L. hoffmeisteri biotransformed TCS through methylation and sulfation, whereas HHCB biotransformation was undetectable.

U2 - 10.1021/acs.est.8b02637

DO - 10.1021/acs.est.8b02637

M3 - Journal article

VL - 52

SP - 8390

EP - 8398

JO - Issues in Environmental Science and Technology

JF - Issues in Environmental Science and Technology

SN - 1350-7583

IS - 15

ER -