Barriers and possibilities for the emerging alternative lighting technologies

Araceli Bjarklev, Tyge Kjær, Jan Andersen

Publikation: Bidrag til bog/antologi/rapportKonferenceabstrakt i proceedingsForskning

Resumé

20% of the total electricity produced in the world today is used for illumination. Though the use of energy in Europe almost stagnated during the 1990ies, studies reveal that for the next 30 years the consumption of electricity will again increase making the 20% reduction of CO2 goal almost impossible to achieve and this will even only represent 2-3% of the world's total CO2 emissions. Despite the appearance of many energy-saving devises in the 1990ies, the Living Planet Report of 2006 highlighted that humanity´s Ecological Footprint, our impact over the planet, has more than tripled since 1961. This report indicates that our footprint now exceeds the world's ability to regenerate by about 25 percent. Many initiatives are, however, taken to work towards the formulated CO2 reduction goal. One important example is that compact fluorescent lamps currently are in the plans of many countries to phase out the incandescent lamp; However, the emergence of other illumination technologies such as Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) are currently raising in question, whether the fluorescent lamp is the technology that best can reduce the (large) illumination cological footprint. Europe and more specifically Denmark, a country with a strong experience on photonic technologies, could contribute in reducing the lighting ecological footprint due to its human, and physical capitals related to this industry. Still Europe struggles with the paradox of losing productive jobs in this sector. This study will explore the question: What are the main possibilities and limitations for the Danish lighting Industry to help reducing the global illumination ecological footprint and what can be improved in the current illumination value chain in order to use the possibilities?
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TitelJoint Actions on Climate Change 2009
Antal sider1
ForlagAalborg Universitet
Publikationsdato2009
Sider345
ISBN (Trykt)978-87-91830-30-3
StatusUdgivet - 2009
BegivenhedJoint Actions on Climate Change - Aalborg, Danmark
Varighed: 8 jun. 200910 jun. 2009

Konference

KonferenceJoint Actions on Climate Change
LandDanmark
ByAalborg
Periode08/06/200910/06/2009

Emneord

  • Belysning
  • energi
  • CO2 emisioner

Citer dette

Bjarklev, A., Kjær, T., & Andersen, J. (2009). Barriers and possibilities for the emerging alternative lighting technologies. I Joint Actions on Climate Change 2009 (s. 345). Aalborg Universitet.
Bjarklev, Araceli ; Kjær, Tyge ; Andersen, Jan. / Barriers and possibilities for the emerging alternative lighting technologies. Joint Actions on Climate Change 2009. Aalborg Universitet, 2009. s. 345
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Bjarklev, A, Kjær, T & Andersen, J 2009, Barriers and possibilities for the emerging alternative lighting technologies. i Joint Actions on Climate Change 2009. Aalborg Universitet, s. 345, Joint Actions on Climate Change, Aalborg, Danmark, 08/06/2009.

Barriers and possibilities for the emerging alternative lighting technologies. / Bjarklev, Araceli; Kjær, Tyge; Andersen, Jan.

Joint Actions on Climate Change 2009. Aalborg Universitet, 2009. s. 345.

Publikation: Bidrag til bog/antologi/rapportKonferenceabstrakt i proceedingsForskning

TY - ABST

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AU - Bjarklev, Araceli

AU - Kjær, Tyge

AU - Andersen, Jan

PY - 2009

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N2 - 20% of the total electricity produced in the world today is used for illumination. Though the use of energy in Europe almost stagnated during the 1990ies, studies reveal that for the next 30 years the consumption of electricity will again increase making the 20% reduction of CO2 goal almost impossible to achieve and this will even only represent 2-3% of the world's total CO2 emissions. Despite the appearance of many energy-saving devises in the 1990ies, the Living Planet Report of 2006 highlighted that humanity´s Ecological Footprint, our impact over the planet, has more than tripled since 1961. This report indicates that our footprint now exceeds the world's ability to regenerate by about 25 percent. Many initiatives are, however, taken to work towards the formulated CO2 reduction goal. One important example is that compact fluorescent lamps currently are in the plans of many countries to phase out the incandescent lamp; However, the emergence of other illumination technologies such as Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) are currently raising in question, whether the fluorescent lamp is the technology that best can reduce the (large) illumination cological footprint. Europe and more specifically Denmark, a country with a strong experience on photonic technologies, could contribute in reducing the lighting ecological footprint due to its human, and physical capitals related to this industry. Still Europe struggles with the paradox of losing productive jobs in this sector. This study will explore the question: What are the main possibilities and limitations for the Danish lighting Industry to help reducing the global illumination ecological footprint and what can be improved in the current illumination value chain in order to use the possibilities?

AB - 20% of the total electricity produced in the world today is used for illumination. Though the use of energy in Europe almost stagnated during the 1990ies, studies reveal that for the next 30 years the consumption of electricity will again increase making the 20% reduction of CO2 goal almost impossible to achieve and this will even only represent 2-3% of the world's total CO2 emissions. Despite the appearance of many energy-saving devises in the 1990ies, the Living Planet Report of 2006 highlighted that humanity´s Ecological Footprint, our impact over the planet, has more than tripled since 1961. This report indicates that our footprint now exceeds the world's ability to regenerate by about 25 percent. Many initiatives are, however, taken to work towards the formulated CO2 reduction goal. One important example is that compact fluorescent lamps currently are in the plans of many countries to phase out the incandescent lamp; However, the emergence of other illumination technologies such as Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) are currently raising in question, whether the fluorescent lamp is the technology that best can reduce the (large) illumination cological footprint. Europe and more specifically Denmark, a country with a strong experience on photonic technologies, could contribute in reducing the lighting ecological footprint due to its human, and physical capitals related to this industry. Still Europe struggles with the paradox of losing productive jobs in this sector. This study will explore the question: What are the main possibilities and limitations for the Danish lighting Industry to help reducing the global illumination ecological footprint and what can be improved in the current illumination value chain in order to use the possibilities?

KW - Belysning

KW - energi

KW - CO2 emisioner

KW - Lighting

KW - energy

KW - CO2 emissions

M3 - Conference abstract in proceedings

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BT - Joint Actions on Climate Change 2009

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Bjarklev A, Kjær T, Andersen J. Barriers and possibilities for the emerging alternative lighting technologies. I Joint Actions on Climate Change 2009. Aalborg Universitet. 2009. s. 345