Bacterial cell curvature through mechanical control of cell growth

M. Cabeen, Godefroid Charbon, W. Vollmer, P. Born, N. Ausmees, DB Weibel, C. Jacobs-Wagner

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

    Resumé

    The cytoskeleton is a key regulator of cell morphogenesis. Crescentin, a bacterial intermediate filament-like protein, is required for the curved shape of Caulobacter crescentus and localizes to the inner cell curvature. Here, we show that crescentin forms a single filamentous structure that collapses into a helix when detached from the cell membrane, suggesting that it is normally maintained in a stretched configuration. Crescentin causes an elongation rate gradient around the circumference of the sidewall, creating a longitudinal cell length differential and hence curvature. Such curvature can be produced by physical force alone when cells are grown in circular microchambers. Production of crescentin in Escherichia coli is sufficient to generate cell curvature. Our data argue for a model in which physical strain borne by the crescentin structure anisotropically alters the kinetics of cell wall insertion to produce curved growth. Our study suggests that bacteria may use the cytoskeleton for mechanical control of growth to alter morphology
    OriginalsprogEngelsk
    TidsskriftEMBO Journal
    Vol/bind28
    Udgave nummer9
    Sider (fra-til)1208-19
    ISSN0261-4189
    DOI
    StatusUdgivet - 2009

    Citer dette

    Cabeen, M., Charbon, G., Vollmer, W., Born, P., Ausmees, N., Weibel, DB., & Jacobs-Wagner, C. (2009). Bacterial cell curvature through mechanical control of cell growth. EMBO Journal, 28(9), 1208-19. https://doi.org/10.1038/emboj.2009.61
    Cabeen, M. ; Charbon, Godefroid ; Vollmer, W. ; Born, P. ; Ausmees, N. ; Weibel, DB ; Jacobs-Wagner, C. / Bacterial cell curvature through mechanical control of cell growth. I: EMBO Journal. 2009 ; Bind 28, Nr. 9. s. 1208-19.
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    title = "Bacterial cell curvature through mechanical control of cell growth",
    abstract = "The cytoskeleton is a key regulator of cell morphogenesis. Crescentin, a bacterial intermediate filament-like protein, is required for the curved shape of Caulobacter crescentus and localizes to the inner cell curvature. Here, we show that crescentin forms a single filamentous structure that collapses into a helix when detached from the cell membrane, suggesting that it is normally maintained in a stretched configuration. Crescentin causes an elongation rate gradient around the circumference of the sidewall, creating a longitudinal cell length differential and hence curvature. Such curvature can be produced by physical force alone when cells are grown in circular microchambers. Production of crescentin in Escherichia coli is sufficient to generate cell curvature. Our data argue for a model in which physical strain borne by the crescentin structure anisotropically alters the kinetics of cell wall insertion to produce curved growth. Our study suggests that bacteria may use the cytoskeleton for mechanical control of growth to alter morphology",
    keywords = "bacterial cell morphogenesis, cell curvature, crescentin, cytoskeleton, peptidoglycan",
    author = "M. Cabeen and Godefroid Charbon and W. Vollmer and P. Born and N. Ausmees and DB Weibel and C. Jacobs-Wagner",
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    Cabeen, M, Charbon, G, Vollmer, W, Born, P, Ausmees, N, Weibel, DB & Jacobs-Wagner, C 2009, 'Bacterial cell curvature through mechanical control of cell growth', EMBO Journal, bind 28, nr. 9, s. 1208-19. https://doi.org/10.1038/emboj.2009.61

    Bacterial cell curvature through mechanical control of cell growth. / Cabeen, M.; Charbon, Godefroid; Vollmer, W.; Born, P.; Ausmees, N.; Weibel, DB; Jacobs-Wagner, C.

    I: EMBO Journal, Bind 28, Nr. 9, 2009, s. 1208-19.

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Bacterial cell curvature through mechanical control of cell growth

    AU - Cabeen, M.

    AU - Charbon, Godefroid

    AU - Vollmer, W.

    AU - Born, P.

    AU - Ausmees, N.

    AU - Weibel, DB

    AU - Jacobs-Wagner, C.

    PY - 2009

    Y1 - 2009

    N2 - The cytoskeleton is a key regulator of cell morphogenesis. Crescentin, a bacterial intermediate filament-like protein, is required for the curved shape of Caulobacter crescentus and localizes to the inner cell curvature. Here, we show that crescentin forms a single filamentous structure that collapses into a helix when detached from the cell membrane, suggesting that it is normally maintained in a stretched configuration. Crescentin causes an elongation rate gradient around the circumference of the sidewall, creating a longitudinal cell length differential and hence curvature. Such curvature can be produced by physical force alone when cells are grown in circular microchambers. Production of crescentin in Escherichia coli is sufficient to generate cell curvature. Our data argue for a model in which physical strain borne by the crescentin structure anisotropically alters the kinetics of cell wall insertion to produce curved growth. Our study suggests that bacteria may use the cytoskeleton for mechanical control of growth to alter morphology

    AB - The cytoskeleton is a key regulator of cell morphogenesis. Crescentin, a bacterial intermediate filament-like protein, is required for the curved shape of Caulobacter crescentus and localizes to the inner cell curvature. Here, we show that crescentin forms a single filamentous structure that collapses into a helix when detached from the cell membrane, suggesting that it is normally maintained in a stretched configuration. Crescentin causes an elongation rate gradient around the circumference of the sidewall, creating a longitudinal cell length differential and hence curvature. Such curvature can be produced by physical force alone when cells are grown in circular microchambers. Production of crescentin in Escherichia coli is sufficient to generate cell curvature. Our data argue for a model in which physical strain borne by the crescentin structure anisotropically alters the kinetics of cell wall insertion to produce curved growth. Our study suggests that bacteria may use the cytoskeleton for mechanical control of growth to alter morphology

    KW - bacterial cell morphogenesis

    KW - cell curvature

    KW - crescentin

    KW - cytoskeleton

    KW - peptidoglycan

    U2 - 10.1038/emboj.2009.61

    DO - 10.1038/emboj.2009.61

    M3 - Journal article

    VL - 28

    SP - 1208

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    JF - E M B O Journal

    SN - 0261-4189

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    Cabeen M, Charbon G, Vollmer W, Born P, Ausmees N, Weibel DB et al. Bacterial cell curvature through mechanical control of cell growth. EMBO Journal. 2009;28(9):1208-19. https://doi.org/10.1038/emboj.2009.61