An assessment of the importance of exposure routes to the uptake and internal localisation of fluorescent nanoparticles in zebrafish (Danio rerio), using light sheet microscopy

Lars M Skjolding, Giedre Asmonaite, Rasmus Irming Jølck, Thomas Lars Andresen, Henriette Selck, Anders Baun, Joachim Sturve

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Resumé

A major challenge in nanoecotoxicology is finding suitable methods to determine the uptake and localisation of nanoparticles on a whole-organism level. Some uptake methods have been associated with artefacts induced by sample preparation, including staining for electron microscopy. This study used light sheet microscopy (LSM) to define the uptake and localisation of fluorescently labelled nanoparticles in living organisms with minimal sample preparation. Zebrafish (Danio rerio) were exposed to fluorescent gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) and fluorescent polystyrene NPs via aqueous or dietary exposure. The in vivo uptake and localisation of NPs were investigated using LSM at different time points (1, 3 and 7 days). A time-dependent increase in fluorescence was observed in the gut after dietary exposure to both Au NPs and polystyrene NPs. No fluorescence was observed within gut epithelia regardless of the NP exposure route indicating no or limited uptake via intestinal villi. Fish exposed to polystyrene NPs through the aqueous phase emitted fluorescence signals from the gills and intestine. Fluorescence was also detected in the head region of the fish after aqueous exposure to polystyrene NPs. This was not observed for Au NPs. Aqueous exposure to Au NPs resulted in increased relative swimming distance, while no effect was observed for other exposures. This study supports that the route of exposure is essential for the uptake and subsequent localisation of nanoparticles in zebrafish. Furthermore, it demonstrates that the localisation of NPs in whole living organisms can be visualised in real-time, using LSM.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftNanotoxicology
Vol/bind11
Udgave nummer3
Sider (fra-til)351-359
Antal sider9
ISSN1743-5390
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2017

Bibliografisk note

This work is part of the EnvNano (Environmental Effects and Risk Evaluation of Engineered Nanoparticles) project supported by the European Research Council [grant No. 281579]. Lars Michael Skjolding and Anders Baun were kindly funded by ERC [grant No. 281579].

Emneord

  • Ecotoxicology
  • environmental toxicology
  • nanotoxicology

Citer dette

Skjolding, Lars M ; Asmonaite, Giedre ; Jølck, Rasmus Irming ; Andresen, Thomas Lars ; Selck, Henriette ; Baun, Anders ; Sturve, Joachim. / An assessment of the importance of exposure routes to the uptake and internal localisation of fluorescent nanoparticles in zebrafish (Danio rerio), using light sheet microscopy. I: Nanotoxicology. 2017 ; Bind 11, Nr. 3. s. 351-359.
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title = "An assessment of the importance of exposure routes to the uptake and internal localisation of fluorescent nanoparticles in zebrafish (Danio rerio), using light sheet microscopy",
abstract = "A major challenge in nanoecotoxicology is finding suitable methods to determine the uptake and localisation of nanoparticles on a whole-organism level. Some uptake methods have been associated with artefacts induced by sample preparation, including staining for electron microscopy. This study used light sheet microscopy (LSM) to define the uptake and localisation of fluorescently labelled nanoparticles in living organisms with minimal sample preparation. Zebrafish (Danio rerio) were exposed to fluorescent gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) and fluorescent polystyrene NPs via aqueous or dietary exposure. The in vivo uptake and localisation of NPs were investigated using LSM at different time points (1, 3 and 7 days). A time-dependent increase in fluorescence was observed in the gut after dietary exposure to both Au NPs and polystyrene NPs. No fluorescence was observed within gut epithelia regardless of the NP exposure route indicating no or limited uptake via intestinal villi. Fish exposed to polystyrene NPs through the aqueous phase emitted fluorescence signals from the gills and intestine. Fluorescence was also detected in the head region of the fish after aqueous exposure to polystyrene NPs. This was not observed for Au NPs. Aqueous exposure to Au NPs resulted in increased relative swimming distance, while no effect was observed for other exposures. This study supports that the route of exposure is essential for the uptake and subsequent localisation of nanoparticles in zebrafish. Furthermore, it demonstrates that the localisation of NPs in whole living organisms can be visualised in real-time, using LSM.",
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author = "Skjolding, {Lars M} and Giedre Asmonaite and J{\o}lck, {Rasmus Irming} and Andresen, {Thomas Lars} and Henriette Selck and Anders Baun and Joachim Sturve",
note = "This work is part of the EnvNano (Environmental Effects and Risk Evaluation of Engineered Nanoparticles) project supported by the European Research Council [grant No. 281579]. Lars Michael Skjolding and Anders Baun were kindly funded by ERC [grant No. 281579].",
year = "2017",
doi = "10.1080/17435390.2017.1306128",
language = "English",
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An assessment of the importance of exposure routes to the uptake and internal localisation of fluorescent nanoparticles in zebrafish (Danio rerio), using light sheet microscopy. / Skjolding, Lars M; Asmonaite, Giedre; Jølck, Rasmus Irming; Andresen, Thomas Lars; Selck, Henriette; Baun, Anders; Sturve, Joachim.

I: Nanotoxicology, Bind 11, Nr. 3, 2017, s. 351-359.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

TY - JOUR

T1 - An assessment of the importance of exposure routes to the uptake and internal localisation of fluorescent nanoparticles in zebrafish (Danio rerio), using light sheet microscopy

AU - Skjolding, Lars M

AU - Asmonaite, Giedre

AU - Jølck, Rasmus Irming

AU - Andresen, Thomas Lars

AU - Selck, Henriette

AU - Baun, Anders

AU - Sturve, Joachim

N1 - This work is part of the EnvNano (Environmental Effects and Risk Evaluation of Engineered Nanoparticles) project supported by the European Research Council [grant No. 281579]. Lars Michael Skjolding and Anders Baun were kindly funded by ERC [grant No. 281579].

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - A major challenge in nanoecotoxicology is finding suitable methods to determine the uptake and localisation of nanoparticles on a whole-organism level. Some uptake methods have been associated with artefacts induced by sample preparation, including staining for electron microscopy. This study used light sheet microscopy (LSM) to define the uptake and localisation of fluorescently labelled nanoparticles in living organisms with minimal sample preparation. Zebrafish (Danio rerio) were exposed to fluorescent gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) and fluorescent polystyrene NPs via aqueous or dietary exposure. The in vivo uptake and localisation of NPs were investigated using LSM at different time points (1, 3 and 7 days). A time-dependent increase in fluorescence was observed in the gut after dietary exposure to both Au NPs and polystyrene NPs. No fluorescence was observed within gut epithelia regardless of the NP exposure route indicating no or limited uptake via intestinal villi. Fish exposed to polystyrene NPs through the aqueous phase emitted fluorescence signals from the gills and intestine. Fluorescence was also detected in the head region of the fish after aqueous exposure to polystyrene NPs. This was not observed for Au NPs. Aqueous exposure to Au NPs resulted in increased relative swimming distance, while no effect was observed for other exposures. This study supports that the route of exposure is essential for the uptake and subsequent localisation of nanoparticles in zebrafish. Furthermore, it demonstrates that the localisation of NPs in whole living organisms can be visualised in real-time, using LSM.

AB - A major challenge in nanoecotoxicology is finding suitable methods to determine the uptake and localisation of nanoparticles on a whole-organism level. Some uptake methods have been associated with artefacts induced by sample preparation, including staining for electron microscopy. This study used light sheet microscopy (LSM) to define the uptake and localisation of fluorescently labelled nanoparticles in living organisms with minimal sample preparation. Zebrafish (Danio rerio) were exposed to fluorescent gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) and fluorescent polystyrene NPs via aqueous or dietary exposure. The in vivo uptake and localisation of NPs were investigated using LSM at different time points (1, 3 and 7 days). A time-dependent increase in fluorescence was observed in the gut after dietary exposure to both Au NPs and polystyrene NPs. No fluorescence was observed within gut epithelia regardless of the NP exposure route indicating no or limited uptake via intestinal villi. Fish exposed to polystyrene NPs through the aqueous phase emitted fluorescence signals from the gills and intestine. Fluorescence was also detected in the head region of the fish after aqueous exposure to polystyrene NPs. This was not observed for Au NPs. Aqueous exposure to Au NPs resulted in increased relative swimming distance, while no effect was observed for other exposures. This study supports that the route of exposure is essential for the uptake and subsequent localisation of nanoparticles in zebrafish. Furthermore, it demonstrates that the localisation of NPs in whole living organisms can be visualised in real-time, using LSM.

KW - Ecotoxicology

KW - environmental toxicology

KW - nanotoxicology

KW - Ecotoxicology

KW - environmental toxicology

KW - nanotoxicology

U2 - 10.1080/17435390.2017.1306128

DO - 10.1080/17435390.2017.1306128

M3 - Journal article

VL - 11

SP - 351

EP - 359

JO - Nanotoxicology

JF - Nanotoxicology

SN - 1743-5390

IS - 3

ER -