A new system of labour management in African large-scale agriculture?

Peter Gibbon, Lone Riisgaard

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

    Resumé

    This paper applies a convention theory (CT) approach to the analysis of labour management systems in African large-scale farming. The reconstruction of previous analyses of high-value crop production on large-scale farms in Africa in terms of CT suggests that, since 1980–95, labour management has moved from a ‘domestic’ to a ‘market’ system. However, data collected by the authors from a sample of 11 large-scale rose farms in Kenya in 2011 (covering around 20% of national output) points to the adoption of systems that, in CT terms, combine ‘industrial’ and ‘civic’ elements. The paper concludes by suggesting a series of hypotheses that might explain this trend.
    OriginalsprogEngelsk
    TidsskriftJournal of Agrarian Change
    Vol/bind14
    Udgave nummer1
    Sider (fra-til)94-128
    ISSN1471-0358
    DOI
    StatusUdgivet - jan. 2014

    Emneord

    • labour
    • large-scale agriculture
    • Africa
    • convention theory

    Citer dette

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    A new system of labour management in African large-scale agriculture? / Gibbon, Peter; Riisgaard, Lone.

    I: Journal of Agrarian Change, Bind 14, Nr. 1, 01.2014, s. 94-128.

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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